Scotticism


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Scot·ti·cism

 (skŏt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
An idiom or other expression characteristic of Scottish English.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Scotticism

(ˈskɒtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) a Scottish idiom, word, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Scotticism, Scoticism, Scottishism

a feature characteristic of Scottish English or a word or phrase commonly used in Scotland rather than in England or America, as bonny.
See also: Language
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

Scotticism

[ˈskɒtɪsɪzəm] Ngiro m escocés, escocesismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Scotticism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
(13) Citing Churchill's A New Grammar of the English Language (1823), Visser acknowledges that the verb cause without the infinitive marker to has been traditionally considered a Scotticism (1973, 2256).
AS we enter the New Year I am reminded of my mother's Scotticism, 'Lang may your lum reek'.
In a similar vein is Pat Rogers "Boswell and the Scotticism," which describes how the Laird-to-be of Auch-inleck alternately trembled for and gloried in his sociolinguistic heritage, how he mastered, or nearly mastered, the diction and accent of the South, and how his case resembled Hume's and Robertson's.
However, before Scott, 'literary Scotchmen' had 'exhibited their Scotticism openly, ostentatiously, and with almost plaguy loudness'.
Although his treatment of Scottish forms is not thorough and systematic, some interesting patterns appear to emerge: for instance, it is remarkable that 'Scotticism', the notoriously proscribing label of the times, never occurs, while the preservation of older forms is often indicated.
With respect to Macbeth, although names such as 'the Western Isles', 'Fife' and 'Forres' employed in the early scenes of the play clearly indicate Scottish locations that 'were predominantly Gaelic-speaking both in the eleventh-century when the play is set and at the beginning of the seventeenth' century, Shakespeare avoids using linguistic markers of Scottish identity apart from the occasional use of 'unexceptional Scotticism' such as 'loon' for 'rogue' in 'thou cream-faced loon' and 'filed' in 'filed my mind'.
1839 tokens of Scotticisms were found throughout the Fife-Rose corpus, giving a rate of one Scotticism token per 123 words.
Chapter 2, 'Models and rivals', gives a sense of the methodological background which Jamieson used in order to construct his dictionary (and, indeed, the lists which predate the dictionary proper), ranging from the seventeenth century lists and glossaries, the eighteenth century Scotticism lists and Boswell's attempted dictionary, as well as the English tradition given recent strength and definition by Johnson.
Once again, an overt Scotticism (the -nae negation particle) is used, not primarily to convey the content of the message, but for the sake of recognition and thus to strengthen the association with Scotland.
Viewed in this light, Ramsay's use of Scots vernacular is a re-mediation within language that contrasts directly with the move by elite Scots toward London and English as the polite standard after 1660, a move accelerated by the Act of Union, and a corresponding disparagement of Scots embodied at mid-century by a coordinated effort among polite authors like David Hume to purge their writing and speaking of 'Scotticisms'.
Leddy Grippy's amusing Scotticisms add great spice to her disparagement of her lawyer, one "Jamphrey" (an unsubtle play on Jeffrey and "clamjamphrie," which currently meant "rabble," "trumpery," or "purse-proud vulgar").
To create 'social' and 'cultural capital' with their counterparts in London, where valuable networks ('social capital') and appropriate cultural references ('cultural capital') could be adhered to and expressed, Edinburgh society eagerly wished to shed the 'provincial' image speaking 'Scotticisms' or Scots provided (Jones 1995: 1-21).