scroyle

scroyle

(skrɔɪl)
n
archaic a wretch or a mean or unfortunate person
References in periodicals archive ?
My own childhood was filled with pillocks and barnpots but there were glorious ones from the time of Shakespeare and Chaucer: sheep-biting knave, pottle-deep baggage, scroyle and gundygut.
He was good at one liners of abuse such as calling someone a curpin (which is the rump of a fowl and also a man's bottom), describing them as mundungus (offal or waste), a scroyle (good for nothing), a sKellum (rogue or rascal) and a gundygut (voracious eater).
By heaven, these scroyles of Angiers flout You kings And stand securely on their battlements, As in a theatre, whence they gape and point At your industrious scenes and acts of death (Il.