Scylla


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Related to Scylla: Charybdis

Scyl·la

 (sĭl′ə)
n. Greek Mythology
A female sea monster who lived in a cave opposite Charybdis and devoured sailors.
Idiom:
between Scylla and Charybdis
In a position where avoidance of one danger exposes one to another danger.

Scylla

(ˈsɪlə)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a sea nymph transformed into a sea monster believed to drown sailors navigating the Strait of Messina. She was identified with a rock off the Italian coast. Compare Charybdis
2. between Scylla and Charybdis in a predicament in which avoidance of either of two dangers means exposure to the other

Scyl•la

(ˈsɪl ə)

n.
1. a rock in the Strait of Messina off the S coast of Italy.
2. a sea nymph of Greek myth who was transformed into a monster: later identified with the rock Scylla.
Idioms:
between Scylla and Charybdis, between two equally perilous alternatives.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scylla - (Greek mythology) a sea nymph transformed into a sea monster who lived on one side of a narrow straitScylla - (Greek mythology) a sea nymph transformed into a sea monster who lived on one side of a narrow strait; drowned and devoured sailors who tried to escape Charybdis (a whirlpool) on the other side of the strait
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations

Scylla

[ˈsɪlə] N Scylla and CharybdisEscila y Caribdis

Scylla

[ˈsɪlə] nScilla
References in classic literature ?
THE SIRENS, SCYLLA AND CHARYBDIS, THE CATTLE OF THE SUN.
Inside it Scylla sits and yelps with a voice that you might take to be that of a young hound, but in truth she is a dreadful monster and no one--not even a god--could face her without being terror-struck.
Three times in the day does she vomit forth her waters, and three times she sucks them down again; see that you be not there when she is sucking, for if you are, Neptune himself could not save you; you must hug the Scylla side and drive ship by as fast as you can, for you had better lose six men than your whole crew.
Is there no way,' said I, 'of escaping Charybdis, and at the same time keeping Scylla off when she is trying to harm my men?
As an example of motiveless degradation of character, we have Menelaus in the Orestes: of character indecorous and inappropriate, the lament of Odysseus in the Scylla, and the speech of Melanippe: of inconsistency, the Iphigenia at Aulis,--for Iphigenia the suppliant in no way resembles her later self.
828: In the "Great Eoiae" Scylla is the daughter of Phoebus and Hecate.
The reader can form an idea of the numberless embarrassments which this double relationship had caused him, and of all the temporal reefs among which his spiritual bark had been forced to tack, in order not to suffer shipwreck on either Louis or Charles, that Scylla and that Charybdis which had devoured the Duc de Nemours and the Constable de Saint-Pol.
They were always fight--I mean, father had--that is, I mean, WE had more trouble keeping peace between them than we did between any of the rest of the Aiders," corrected Pollyanna, a little breathless from her efforts to steer between the Scylla of her father's past commands in regard to speaking of church quarrels, and the Charybdis of her aunt's present commands in regard to speaking of her father.
Farr less abhorrd then these Vex'd SCYLLA bathing in the Sea that parts CALABRIA from the hoarce TRINACRIAN shore: Nor uglier follow the Night-Hag, when call'd In secret, riding through the Air she comes Lur'd with the smell of infant blood, to dance With LAPLAND Witches, while the labouring Moon Eclipses at thir charms.
The small matter which I have chronicled under the heading of "A Study in Scarlet," and that other later one connected with the loss of the Gloria Scott, may serve as examples of this Scylla and Charybdis which are forever threatening the historian.
It made me quite faint to feel that we might escape the Scylla of our present peril and yet split on the Charybdis of circumstantial evidence.
An ideal image of the soul, like the composite creations of ancient mythology, such as the Chimera or Scylla or Cerberus, and there are many others in which two or more different natures are said to grow into one.