Merginae

(redirected from Seaduck)
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Noun1.Merginae - mergansers and closely related diving birdsMerginae - mergansers and closely related diving birds
bird family - a family of warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
Anatidae, family Anatidae - swimming birds having heavy short-legged bodies and bills with a horny tip: swans; geese; ducks
genus Mergus, Mergus - mergansers
genus Lophodytes, Lophodytes - a genus of Merginae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Surf Scoter, a seaduck more typically found off the north American coast, was found among several hundred Common Scoters at Black Rock Sands on Monday.
Spatial distribution, population dynamics and productivity of Spisula subtruncata: implications for fisheries in seaduck wintering areas.
This seaduck winters in the rocky intertidal zone at the coast and then moves inland to breed on turbulent mountain streams that mimic the crashing wasters of their coastal environment.
Common scoter are a small seaduck, the male black with a yellow and black bill, the female mainly dark brown with lighter brown face pattern and light underparts.
kilometers) of coastal areas in Alaska as critical habitat for the spectacled eider, a threatened seaduck. The proposal covers nesting habitat on the North Slope, the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, and adjacent marine waters; molting areas in eastern Norton Sound and Ledyard Bay; and wintering habitat in the central Bering Sea between St.
Spatial distribution, population dynamics and productivity of Spisula subtruncata: implications for Spisula fisheries in seaduck wintering areas.
The UK breeding population of this mall diving seaduck has substantially declined and it is now on the RSPB conservation red list.
This seaduck winters in the churning rocky intertidal zone at the coast and then moves inland to breed on turbulent mountain streams that mimic the crashing waters of their coastal environment.
When the spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) was listed as a threatened species in 1993, scientists knew very little about this enigmatic seaduck. They were uncertain about total population size and even the location of the birds for nine months out of the year.
Site 1-Outer had no data after December because of seaduck predation and the high density M.
This seaduck winters in the churning rocky intertidal zone at the coast, then moves inland to breed on turbulent mountain streams that mimic the crashing waters of their coastal environment.
Iginiqauqtuq is the Inupiat Eskimo name for the little-known seaduck most people call the Steller's eider (Polysticta stelleri).