seahog


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seahog

(ˈsiːˌhɒɡ)
n
(Animals) a porpoise
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Deputy Chief Constable Andy Cooke, who joined Merseyside in 1985, has served as a detective at every rank and won plaudits for his role in Operation Seahog - which targeted criminal gangs running the city's security industry.
But he said pulling the whopping 193lb skate on to his boat, the Seahog Trooper, last week was his biggest battle yet.
Since 2006 when Operation Seahog was set up, officers have visited more than 970 construction sites, executed 64 warrants, investigated 52 security firms and prosecuted 184 people for working without a Security Industry Authority (SIA) licence.
One of the crafts - an 18ft Seahog called the Amy Florence - was towing a waterskier when it ploughed into a 15ft speedboat with two adults and three children on board.
The Amy Florence, an 18ft Seahog craft with two people aboard, was towing the water-skier when it was in collision with the second boat - a 16ft Fletcher vessel with the boy, his sister and a friend on board together with two adults, believed to be their parents.
Police visited several of their customers as part of a sting called Operation Seahog.
The initiative, entitled Operation Seahog and part of Chief Constable Bernard Hogan-Howe's Total Policing agenda, is designed to clamp down on directors and managers of security firms suspected of masterminding organised crime gangs.
It prompted Merseyside Police to launch Operation Seahog.
Two directors from CTN, based in Aintree and Mossley Hill, were among seven people charged by officers from Operation Seahog.
SEAHOG'S main victory came against Fazakerley gangster David Hibbs-Turner, who ran his protection racket while in prison awaiting trial for murder.