secession

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se·ces·sion

 (sĭ-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of seceding.
2. often Secession The withdrawal of 11 Southern states from the Union in 1860-1861, precipitating the US Civil War.

[Latin sēcessiō, sēcessiōn-, from sēcessus, past participle of sēcēdere, to secede; see secede.]

se·ces′sion·al adj.

secession

(sɪˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act of seceding
2. (Historical Terms) (often capital) chiefly US the withdrawal in 1860–61 of 11 Southern states from the Union to form the Confederacy, precipitating the American Civil War
[C17: from Latin sēcessiō a withdrawing, from sēcēdere to secede]
seˈcessional adj
seˈcessionˌism n
seˈcessionist n, adj

se•ces•sion

(sɪˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. an act or instance of seceding.
2. (often cap.) the withdrawal from the Union of 11 southern states in the period 1860–61, which brought on the Civil War.
[1525–35; < Latin sēcessiō withdrawal]
se•ces′sion•al, adj.

Secession

 a body of seceders, 1600; secessionists collectively, 1862. Also, secesh.

Secession

The act of leaving the Union by any state.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.secession - an Austrian school of art and architecture parallel to the French art nouveau in the 1890s
school - a body of creative artists or writers or thinkers linked by a similar style or by similar teachers; "the Venetian school of painting"
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
2.Secession - the withdrawal of eleven southern states from the Union in 1860 which precipitated the American Civil War
3.secession - formal separation from an alliance or federation
separation - the act of dividing or disconnecting
breakaway, breaking away - the act of breaking away or withdrawing from; "there was a breakaway by the discontented members"; "a breaking away from family and neighborhood"

secession

noun withdrawal, break, split, defection, seceding, apostasy, disaffiliation the Ukraine's secession from the Soviet Union
Translations

secession

[sɪˈseʃən] Nsecesión f, separación f (from de)

secession

[sɪˈsɛʃən] nsécession f

secession

nAbspaltung f; (US Hist) → Sezession f

secession

[sɪˈsɛʃn] n (frm) secession (from)secessione f (da)
References in periodicals archive ?
The renewed threat of seccession in the coastal areas, which are also strongholds of the opposition, is another thorn in the president's side.
This approach proved to be a double edged sword as it prompted opposite reactions - calls for more decentralization and autonomy in Republika Srpska (including frequent threats of holding a seccession referendum) and calls for creating a third entity for Bosnian Croats who were feeling increasingly marginalized.
Although 40 percent of ministers in the new cabinet are from the south, the Southern Movement is pushing ahead with calls for seccession.
From Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel to the adventurous Egon Schiele, an artistic tearaway who flourished during the turn-of-the-last-century Vienna Seccession movement, and left nothing at all to the imagination where mono-sex pleasures were concerned.
Over two decades of civil war (1983-2005) led to South Sudan's seccession from Sudan last year.