secede

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se·cede

 (sĭ-sēd′)
intr.v. se·ced·ed, se·ced·ing, se·cedes
To withdraw formally from membership in a state, union, or other political entity.

[Latin sēcēdere, to withdraw : sē-, apart; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]

secede

(sɪˈsiːd)
vb
(often foll by: from) (of a person, section, etc) to make a formal withdrawal of membership, as from a political alliance, church, organization, etc
[C18: from Latin sēcēdere to withdraw, from sē- apart + cēdere to go]
seˈceder n

se•cede

(sɪˈsid)

v.i. -ced•ed, -ced•ing.
to withdraw formally from an alliance, federation, or association.
[1695–1705; < Latin sēcēdere to withdraw. See se-, cede]
se•ced′er, n.

secede


Past participle: seceded
Gerund: seceding

Imperative
secede
secede
Present
I secede
you secede
he/she/it secedes
we secede
you secede
they secede
Preterite
I seceded
you seceded
he/she/it seceded
we seceded
you seceded
they seceded
Present Continuous
I am seceding
you are seceding
he/she/it is seceding
we are seceding
you are seceding
they are seceding
Present Perfect
I have seceded
you have seceded
he/she/it has seceded
we have seceded
you have seceded
they have seceded
Past Continuous
I was seceding
you were seceding
he/she/it was seceding
we were seceding
you were seceding
they were seceding
Past Perfect
I had seceded
you had seceded
he/she/it had seceded
we had seceded
you had seceded
they had seceded
Future
I will secede
you will secede
he/she/it will secede
we will secede
you will secede
they will secede
Future Perfect
I will have seceded
you will have seceded
he/she/it will have seceded
we will have seceded
you will have seceded
they will have seceded
Future Continuous
I will be seceding
you will be seceding
he/she/it will be seceding
we will be seceding
you will be seceding
they will be seceding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been seceding
you have been seceding
he/she/it has been seceding
we have been seceding
you have been seceding
they have been seceding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been seceding
you will have been seceding
he/she/it will have been seceding
we will have been seceding
you will have been seceding
they will have been seceding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been seceding
you had been seceding
he/she/it had been seceding
we had been seceding
you had been seceding
they had been seceding
Conditional
I would secede
you would secede
he/she/it would secede
we would secede
you would secede
they would secede
Past Conditional
I would have seceded
you would have seceded
he/she/it would have seceded
we would have seceded
you would have seceded
they would have seceded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.secede - withdraw from an organization or communion; "After the break up of the Soviet Union, many republics broke away"
break up, part, split, split up, separate, break - discontinue an association or relation; go different ways; "The business partners broke over a tax question"; "The couple separated after 25 years of marriage"; "My friend and I split up"

secede

verb withdraw, leave, resign, separate, retire, quit, pull out, break with, split from, disaffiliate, apostatize On 20 August 1960 Senegal seceded.

secede

verb
To break away or withdraw from membership in an association or a federation:
splinter (off).
Informal: split.
Translations

secede

[sɪˈsiːd] VIsepararse, escindirse (from de)

secede

[sɪˈsiːd] vifaire sécession
to secede from → faire sécession de

secede

visich abspalten

secede

[sɪˈsiːd] vi (frm) to secede (from)staccarsi (da)
References in periodicals archive ?
In Mine-Mill's provincial organ, the BC District Union News, Murphy called the Billingsley group a "clique," "traitors," "seceders," and "ratting shop stewards," claiming that many of them were from "the old company union gang." He said the CCL leadership was "guilty of treachery." (48) He then issued this rallying cry: "Remembering our martyred dead, we fight to see these traditions live." (49) Murphy condemned raid leaders, arguing that "in their mad struggle for power the Charlie Millards, [Aaron] Moshers, [Bill] Mahoneys, etc., care nothing for the conditions of the workers." (50)
(24.) Khawarij literally means seceders, derived from the Arabic verb, kharaja (to secede or move out), while Murji'i literally means one who postpones or defers, derived from irjah (to postpone of defer).
Dutch immigrants arrived in Holland before 1850 as "seceders," whose church was also their government.
Despite efforts like Heywood's to "see if we can't make it a match for the public-house" (Addresses 108), Hudson reports that pubs teemed with "desultory pupils of the evening classes of the Mechanics' Institution as well as the seceders from the Athenaeum" (Hudson 140).
In the mid-1800s, a group of mostly poor farmers known as the "Seceders" rebelled against the Dutch government when it tried to modernize the state Calvinist church, including by changing the songbooks used during worship and ending discriminatory laws against Catholics and Jews.
Instead, its members accused seceders of lacking faith, maturity, and spiritual conviction.
They are an extension of Al Khawarij [the Seceders in the late 7th century who developed and adopted extreme doctrines, declaring other Muslims non-believers who could be killed]," he said in his statement last week
The terrifying "Incident" occurs in a school nestled in a deceptively pastoral setting that resists the encroaching tides of North London suburban growth: "Dissenting chapels, tea-bowers, lovers' lairs, / Neat new-built villas, ample Grecian squares, / Remaining orchards ripening Windsor pears." This is the native territory of middle-class dissenters, who are praised yet gently mocked for their Protestant work ethic ("blest with this worlds possessions") and for their stubborn conscience and sectarianism ("Seceders from the Protestant Secessions").
Lincoln had once hoped that the secession problem could be resolved without dealing too harshly with the seceders, that appeals to "the mystic chords of memory" would draw them back.
It is a new affront and wrong to the slave states, and raises a wall against the return of the seceders. The December 21, 1861, issue of the Athenaeum commented,
(12) The Presbyterian and Reformed churches involved were: The Church of Scotland; The United Free Church of Scotland; The Synod of Original Seceders; The Presbyterian Church of England; The Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Church; The Presbyterian Church of Ireland; The Presbyterian Church in the United States of America; The United Presbyterian Church of North America; The Reformed (Dutch) Church in America; The Presbyterian Church of Canada; The Reformed Presbytery of India; and The Gopalgunge Evangelistic Mission.
But by the 19th century many Jews had moved away, to what were then the suburbs, and found Shearith Israel "very far from the convenience of a considerable number of our brethren." Besides, the Sephardic population had given way to new Ashkenazi immigrants from Germany and Poland, who found "it difficult to accustom [themselves] to the Portuguese minhag." The seceders built an imposing new synagogue, B'nai Jeshurun; but apparently it wasn't good enough, because just three years later a group of Jews split from B'nai Jeshurun to found their own congregation, Anshe Chesed.