declension

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declension

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de·clen·sion

 (dĭ-klĕn′shən)
n.
1. Linguistics
a. In certain languages, the inflection of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives with respect to categories such as case, number, and gender.
b. A class of words of one language with the same or a similar system of inflections, such as the first declension in Latin.
2. A descending slope; a descent.
3. A decline or decrease; deterioration: "States and empires have their periods of declension" (Laurence Sterne).
4. A deviation, as from a standard or practice.

[Middle English declenson, from Old French declinaison, from Latin dēclīnātiō, dēclīnātiōn-, grammatical declension, declination; see declination.]

de·clen′sion·al adj.

declension

(dɪˈklɛnʃən)
n
1. (Grammar) grammar
a. the inflection of nouns, pronouns, or adjectives for case, number, and gender
b. the complete set of the inflections of such a word: "puella" is a first-declension noun in Latin.
2. a decline or deviation from a standard, belief, etc
3. a downward slope or bend
[C15: from Latin dēclīnātiō, literally: a bending aside, hence variation, inflection; see decline]
deˈclensional adj
deˈclensionally adv

de•clen•sion

(dɪˈklɛn ʃən)

n.
1.
a. the inflection of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives for categories such as case and number.
b. the whole set of inflected forms of such a word, or the recital thereof in a fixed order.
c. a class of such words having similar sets of inflected forms: the Latin second declension.
2. a bending, sloping, or moving downward.
3. deterioration; decline.
[1400–50; < Old French declinaison < Latin dēclīnātiō declination]
de•clen′sion•al, adj.

declension

An inflection or set of inflections for a noun, pronoun, or adjective.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.declension - the inflection of nouns and pronouns and adjectives in Indo-European languages
noun - the word class that can serve as the subject or object of a verb, the object of a preposition, or in apposition
inflection, inflexion - a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
2.declension - process of changing to an inferior state
decline, diminution - change toward something smaller or lower
drop-off, falling off, falloff, slump, slack - a noticeable deterioration in performance or quality; "the team went into a slump"; "a gradual slack in output"; "a drop-off in attendance"; "a falloff in quality"
3.declension - a downward slope or bend
downhill - the downward slope of a hill
incline, slope, side - an elevated geological formation; "he climbed the steep slope"; "the house was built on the side of a mountain"
steep - a steep place (as on a hill)
4.declension - a class of nouns or pronouns or adjectives in Indo-European languages having the same (or very similar) inflectional forms; "the first declension in Latin"
category, class, family - a collection of things sharing a common attribute; "there are two classes of detergents"

declension

noun
Descent to a lower level or condition:
Translations
deklinaceskloňování
taivutus
declinatio
declinare
sklanjatev

declension

[dɪˈklenʃən] N (Ling) → declinación f

declension

n (Gram) → Deklination f

declension

[dɪˈklɛnʃn] n (Gram) → declinazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
Either this radiologist is trying to coin a new word--not generally a good idea in a radiology report--or perhaps he is a fallen Latin scholar, mistakenly believing "visci" to be the masculine second declension plural of "viscus.
Among the topics are the sound system and its symbols, the first declension, prepositions, the verb "to be," adjectives of the first and second declension, the conjugations of the verb, the present system middle-passive, the pronouns, adjectives of the third declension and their comparison, and the future and aorist active and middle.
Another class of nouns, those belonging to the second declension (Dec12), may be lexically specified as having the grammatical gender feminine (e.
Second declension nominals fall similarly into a number of prosodically-definable subtypes, including monosyllabic nominals such as PUU 'tree', iambic nominals such as TROFEE 'trophy' and nominals such as KIRIK 'church' with dactylic genitive singulars like kiriku.
not knowing (or for having forgotten) something as complicated as the genitive plural form of a second declension Latin noun.
Yet the interpretation in question requires a form which is properly that of the second declension singular.
Among the topics are the present tense by conjugation, first and second declension adjectives, uses of the genitive, pluperfect and future perfect active, passive of the perfect system, demonstratives, direct questions, vocative and locative, indefinite adjectives, the ablative absolute, and fourth and fifth declensions.
For example, the 2sg infinitive form 'hakka and the 2pl form hakake identify HAKKAMA as a second declension verb and imply the strong supine 'hakkama, and the weak infinitive and past impersonals hakata and hakati, among other forms.