derivative

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de·riv·a·tive

 (dĭ-rĭv′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Resulting from or employing derivation: a derivative word; a derivative process.
2. Copied or adapted from others: a highly derivative prose style.
n.
1. Something derived.
2. Linguistics A word formed from another by derivation, such as electricity from electric.
3. Mathematics
a. The limiting value of the ratio of the change in a function to the corresponding change in its independent variable.
b. The instantaneous rate of change of a function with respect to its variable.
c. The slope of the tangent line to the graph of a function at a given point. Also called differential coefficient, fluxion.
4. Chemistry A compound derived or obtained from another and containing essential elements of the parent substance.
5. A financial instrument that derives its value from another more fundamental asset, as a commitment to buy a bond for a certain sum on a certain date.

de·riv′a·tive·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

derivative

(dɪˈrɪvətɪv)
adj
1. resulting from derivation; derived
2. based on or making use of other sources; not original or primary
3. copied from others, esp slavishly; plagiaristic
n
4. a term, idea, etc, that is based on or derived from another in the same class
5. (Linguistics) a word derived from another word
6. (Chemistry) chem a compound that is formed from, or can be regarded as formed from, a structurally related compound: chloroform is a derivative of methane.
7. (Mathematics) maths
a. Also called: differential coefficient or first derivative the change of a function, f(x), with respect to an infinitesimally small change in the independent variable, x; the limit of [f(a + Δx)–f(a)]/Δx, at x = a, as the increment, Δx, tends to 0. Symbols: df(x)/dx, f′(x), Df(x): the derivative of xn is nxn–1.
b. the rate of change of one quantity with respect to another: velocity is the derivative of distance with respect to time.
8. (Banking & Finance) finance
a. (usually plural) a financial instrument, such as a futures contract or option, the price of which is largely determined by the commodity, currency, share price, interest rate, etc, to which it is linked
b. (as modifier): a derivatives trader.
9. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal an activity that represents the expression of hidden impulses and desires by channelling them into socially acceptable forms
deˈrivatively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•riv•a•tive

(dɪˈrɪv ə tɪv)

adj.
1. not original; secondary.
n.
2. something derived.
3. a word that has undergone derivation from another, as atomic from atom.
4. a chemical substance or compound obtained or regarded as derived from another.
5. Math. the instantaneous rate of change of one quantity in a function with respect to another.
6. a financial contract whose value derives from the value of underlying stocks, bonds, currencies, commodities, etc.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
de•riv′a•tive•ly, adv.
de•riv′a•tive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·riv·a·tive

(dĭ-rĭv′ə-tĭv)
In calculus, the slope of the tangent line to a curve at a particular point on the curve. Since a curve represents a function, its derivative can also be thought of as the rate of change of the corresponding function at the given point. Derivatives are computed using differentiation.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.derivative - the result of mathematical differentiation; the instantaneous change of one quantity relative to another; df(x)/dx
curvature - the rate of change (at a point) of the angle between a curve and a tangent to the curve
figuring, reckoning, calculation, computation - problem solving that involves numbers or quantities
partial, partial derivative - the derivative of a function of two or more variables with respect to a single variable while the other variables are considered to be constant
2.derivative - a compound obtained from, or regarded as derived from, another compound
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
3.derivative - a financial instrument whose value is based on another security
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right
futures contract - an agreement to buy or sell a specific amount of a commodity or financial instrument at a particular price on a stipulated future date; the contract can be sold before the settlement date
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
option - the right to buy or sell property at an agreed price; the right is purchased and if it is not exercised by a stated date the money is forfeited
4.derivative - (linguistics) a word that is derived from another word; "`electricity' is a derivative of `electric'"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Adj.1.derivative - resulting from or employing derivation; "a derivative process"; "a highly derivative prose style"
derived - formed or developed from something else; not original; "the belief that classes and organizations are secondary and derived"- John Dewey
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

derivative

noun
1. by-product, spin-off, offshoot, descendant, derivation, outgrowth a poppy-seed derivative similar to heroin
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

derivative

adjective
Stemming from an original source:
noun
Something derived from another:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
كَلِمَه مُشْتَقَّهمُشْتَق من
odvozeninaodvozenýderivacederivátnepůvodní
afledningderivativefterlignetuoriginal
tuletis
derivaattajohdannainenjohdos
képzettleszármaztatottszármazékszó
afleidd mynd orîs/hlutar/fyrirbærisafleiddur
pochodna
derivada
odvodeninaodvodený
izpeljankaodvod
avledningderivatderivata
türemiştürev

derivative

[dɪˈrɪvətɪv]
A. ADJ (Chem, Ling) → derivado; (= unoriginal) [literary work, style] → poco original
B. N (Chem, Ling, Fin) → derivado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

derivative

[dɪˈrɪvətɪv]
n
(= thing derived from another) → dérivé m
a derivative of → un dérivé de
(FINANCE) (= financial instrument) → produit m dérivé
adj (= unoriginal) → peu original(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

derivative

adjabgeleitet; (Ling, Chem) → abgeleitet, derivativ; (fig) style, composition, literary work etcnachgeahmt, imitiert; derivative markets (Fin) → Markt mfür Derivate; derivative products (Fin) → Derivate pl
n
Ableitung f; (Ling also, Chem) → Derivat nt
(Fin) → Derivat nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

derivative

[dɪˈrɪvətɪv]
1. adj (pej) (literary work, style) → poco originale
2. n (Chem, Ling) → derivato (Math) → derivata
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

derive

(diˈraiv) verb
(with from).
1. to come or develop from. The word `derives' is derived from an old French word.
2. to draw or take from (a source or origin). We derive comfort from his presence.
ˌderiˈvation (deri-) noun
1. the source or origin (of a word etc).
2. the process of deriving.
derivative (diˈrivətiv) adjective
derived from something else and not original.
noun
a word, substance etc formed from another word, substance etc. `Reader' is a derivative of `read'.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

derivative

n derivado; petroleum — derivado del petróleo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within transportation, the truckload sector is earliest in the cycle to work with shares typically outperforming as the second derivative in freight volume and pricing turns positive and estimates are cut, Wetherbee tells investors in a research note.
For example, you can say, "Hey Google, show me how to find the second derivative of a function" and Google will search for a YouTube video on the subject likethis one from Khan Academy and display it on devices with a screen like a smartphone, tablet or Google Nest Hub.
However, as a currency trader, I love my life in the second derivative, play three dimensional chess with the markets in real time.
1-4 are graphical representations of the positions of the zero contours of the derivatives of the free Gibbs energy in the [Hg.sub.1-x][Mn.sub.x][Te.sub.1-y][Se.sub.y] system in terms of the concentration parameters, starting with the second derivative and the eighth derivative inclusive for the 800 K temperature and the second-order phase coexistence spaces (Fig.
Therefore, in the scalar case (differential systems of dimension one), an evaluation of the third derivative g(x, y, y') can be as expensive as four evaluations of the second derivative f(x, y, y') and at least as two f-evaluations.
In order to find the model with best prediction capacity, PLS regression was applied to different spectra such as raw spectra, first derivative spectra, second derivative spectra, and others.
The first derivative can be interpreted as the slope of the tangent to the signal at each point, and the second derivative is a measure of the curvature of the signal (the rate of change of the slope).
This work contains explicit derivation of the expressions for local statistical descriptors of stress and strain in heterogeneous media using multipoint high order approximation of SBVP solution and second derivative expansion of Green's function approach.
Kok concludes that the function must be quadratic, since the first derivative of a quadratic function is linear and the second derivative is constant.
In such a case, the chosen information relies upon the shape index 5, the mean curvature H, the first derivative along x, and the second derivative along x.
Basic pretreatments such as moving average smoothing, multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), and the second derivative are often used to pretreat NIR data.