messenger

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Related to Second messenger: first messenger

mes·sen·ger

 (mĕs′ən-jər)
n.
1. One that carries messages or performs errands, as:
a. A person employed to carry telegrams, letters, or parcels.
b. A military or official courier.
c. An envoy to another person, party, or government.
2. A bearer of news.
3. A forerunner; a harbinger: the crocus and other messengers of spring.
4.
a. A prophet.
b. Messenger Islam Muhammad. Used with the.
5. Nautical A chain or rope used for hauling in a cable. Also called messenger line.
tr.v. mes·sen·gered, mes·sen·ger·ing, mes·sen·gers
To send by messenger.

[Middle English messanger, from Old French messagier, from message, message; see message.]

messenger

(ˈmɛsɪndʒə)
n
1. a person who takes messages from one person or group to another or others
2. a person who runs errands or is employed to run errands
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a carrier of official dispatches; courier
4. (Nautical Terms) nautical
a. a light line used to haul in a heavy rope
b. an endless belt of chain, rope, or cable, used on a powered winch to take off power
5. (Historical Terms) archaic a herald
[C13: from Old French messagier, from message]

mes•sen•ger

(ˈmɛs ən dʒər)

n.
1. a person who conveys messages or parcels.
2. a light line for pulling a heavier line to a ship, pier, etc.
3. Archaic. a herald or forerunner.
v.t.
4. to send by messenger.
[1175–1225; Middle English messager < Anglo-French; Old French messagier. See message, -er2]

messenger

  • apostle - Comes from Greek apostolos, "messenger."
  • bode - Boda is messenger in Germanic, hence "bode"; at first, a bode was a command—then an omen or premonition.
  • enunciate - Derives from Latin nuntius, "messenger."
  • angel - The word angel was one of the earliest Germanic adoptions from Latin; originally from Greek aggelos, "messenger," it first meant "hireling" or "messenger."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.messenger - a person who carries a messagemessenger - a person who carries a message  
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
conveyer, conveyor - a person who conveys (carries or transmits); "the conveyer of good tidings"
dispatch rider - a messenger who carries military dispatches (usually on a motorcycle)
herald, trumpeter - (formal) a person who announces important news; "the chieftain had a herald who announced his arrival with a trumpet"
bearer - a messenger who bears or presents; "a bearer of good tidings"
errand boy, messenger boy - a boy who earns money by running errands
process-server - someone who personally delivers a process (a writ compelling attendance in court) or court papers to the defendant
runner - a person who is employed to deliver messages or documents; "he sent a runner over with the contract"

messenger

noun courier, agent, runner, carrier, herald, envoy, bearer, go-between, emissary, harbinger, delivery boy, errand boy The document is to be sent by messenger.

messenger

noun
A person who carries messages or is sent on errands:
Translations
رَسُوُلٌرَسول، حامِل رِسالَه
kurýrposel
budbringer
lähetti
kurir
sendiboîi, boîberi
使者
메신저
glasnik
budbärare
คนส่งข่าว
người đưa tin

messenger

[ˈmesɪndʒəʳ]
A. Nmensajero/a m/f
B. CPD messenger boy Nrecadero m

messenger

[ˈmɛsɪndʒər] n
(= bringer of news) → messager/ère m/f
(= courier) → coursier/ière m/fmess hall (US) mess room n (in army)mess m; (in navy)carré m

messenger

n
Bote m (old, form), → Botin f (old, form), → Überbringer(in) m(f), → (einer Nachricht); (Mil) → Kurier(in) m(f); bank messengerBankbote m/-botin f; don’t shoot the messenger (fig)lassen Sie Ihren Zorn an dem Verantwortlichen aus
(Med, Biol) → Botenstoff m

messenger

[ˈmɛsɪndʒəʳ] n (gen) → messaggero/a; (in office) → messo

message

(ˈmesidʒ) noun
1. a piece of information spoken or written, passed from one person to another. I have a message for you from Mr Johnston.
2. the instruction or teaching of a moral story, religion, prophet etc. What message is this story trying to give us?
ˈmessenger (-sindʒə) noun
a person who carries letters, information etc from place to place. The king's messenger brought news of the army's defeat.

messenger

رَسُوُلٌ kurýr budbringer Bote αγγελιαφόρος mensajero lähetti messager kurir messaggero 使者 메신저 boodschapper bud posłaniec mensageiro посланник budbärare คนส่งข่าว ulak người đưa tin 使者
References in periodicals archive ?
Or the primary effector may trigger the production of another signaling chemical, called the second messenger, within the cell.
amp;nbsp;Barbulescu claimed that the company had violated his privacy by monitoring his private messages while at work, adding that he had sent the private messages from a separate second Messenger account.
Duality in the mechanism of action of insulin," Advances in Second Messenger and Phosphoprotein Research, vol.
Reagents and assay kits include reporter gene assays, second messenger assays, cell growth assays, cell death assays and other assays.
In this example a photon striking a rhodopsin or opsin class photoreceptor activates a trimeric G-protein that in turn regulates cyclic nucleotide levels in the cytoplasm, and the levels of this second messenger relay the effect of the photon strike to the cellular metabolism (Yarfitz and Hurley, 1994).
We speculate that TNF-[alpha] might regulate B[degrees]AT1 by second messenger mediated signal transduction proccss(es).
When there was plenty of glucose coming in from the intestine And blood glucose threatened to rise in a short time, The cellular second messenger levels fell to activate the synthase; Glycogen formation was supported at a high pace.
binding of the bacterial second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP interacts with a
Cyclic AMP (CAMP): Second messenger molecule whose production by enzymes called adenylyl cyclases is regulated through receptor activation of G -proteins, and which itself activates certain protein kinases.
One drug which we know directly affects the second messenger system is lithium, which directly affects activation of protein kinase C, which in turn activates protein synthesis of .
His text includes a discussion on the extracellular activity of neurons, and, briefly, on their intracellular functions, known as the second messenger system.