acute care

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acute care

n.
Short-term medical treatment, usually in a hospital, for patients having an acute illness or injury or recovering from surgery.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It highlights the results of commissioned YouGov research into the public perception of primary care providers, and looks to promote the sector and highlight gaps in funding between primary and secondary care.
Mr Goodway added: "If we can resolve these problems with medicines then we ought to be able to prevent patients being readmitted to hospital, and that's where some of the big costs are in secondary care.
This article outlines our observations about the nature of health services provided in the rural secondary care setting and the effect traditional education, service structures and increasing subspecialisation is having.
It highlighted the importance of providing access to high quality integrated services across primary and secondary care, with support through improved information and communication technology.
I believe that legislation is the only mechanism that can ensure all people in Wales receive the same access to high quality care, support and treatment in primary care and secondary care settings.
Nominations for an award can be made by health professionals, caregivers, advocates, or friends and family of the nominee, in five different categories: people with diabetes; diabetes nurse specialists; primary and secondary care professionals; contribution to care in the community; and services to a national patient association.
Patients with a raised pressure of >21mmHg after measurement by applanation tonometry are then referred to secondary care that is there is only one repeat IOP reading.
Far from a done deal, many have argued that rather than ending the internal market, NHS Wales could be sleepwalking from the existing internal market between commissioners and providers to a new competitive environment between primary and secondary care, as scarce resources are fought over.
Speaking in place of the Ministry's chief adviser, services, Gillian Grew, Powell said challenges in the sector included increasing health disparities, the increasing burden of chronic diseases, the ageing population and the need for increased cooperation between primary and secondary care. "We have yet to see community services moving from a district health board setting to a community setting."