secondary source

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Related to Secondary literature: Primary literature

secondary source

- Information or research that is derivative, such as a comment by a historian, an encyclopedia article, or a critical essay.
See also related terms for research.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The history of sexuality, while an established field in critical inquiry, has most of its secondary literature revolving around Western Europe and North America.
The volume's twenty-six essays are grouped logically into six parts: "Self-Reflections," "Legendary Lives," "Beyond the Canon," "Renderings," "Studying German Jewry," and "The End." The essay on Gershom Scholem in part 1 exemplifies the natural storytelling style that makes Reitter's writing such a compelling read, as he provides historical and biographical context (in this case by examining Scholem's diaries and memoir, sometimes including some of his own psychological speculation) before going into detail about the secondary literature he is reviewing.
In the first, the editors, Christopher Kleinhenz and Andrea Dini, provide an overview of essential bibliographical materials for teaching the Canzoniere, which includes editions, translations, selected secondary literature, and electronic/audio-visual resources.
Nurses must have the skills to understand the difference between primary and secondary literature, information needs issues, the methodology hierarchy, critical appraisal, information overload, knowledge decay, the five-step process in using clinical evidence, the FRISBE appraisal tool, the usefulness equation, and the concepts of hunting and foraging.
The Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library, Frost School of Music, University of Miami, is pleased to announce the acquisition of a major collection of books and other secondary literature relating to opera and opera singers.
This book serves as a fine introduction to Jenson's own theology, its sources (particularly Karl Barth), and important secondary literature (especially John Webster and Bruce McCormack), making this theologian in some ways more accessible than do his own writings.
The book includes a bibliography of primary sources, UNMIK media, KFOR media, web sites, interviews, surveys, and secondary literature. Distributed in the US by ISBS.
These two authors are eminent interpreters of Japanese philosophy, but to present such a heavy reliance on secondary literature in a doctoral dissertation is rather astonishing.
It advances very few arguments of the author's own, but usefully paraphrases, in often nearly verbatim translation, both Narten and critical reaction to Narten, as well as adding references to other relevant secondary literature that has appeared since Narten's edition.

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