sedimentary rock

(redirected from Sediment bed)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

sedimentary rock


click for a larger image
Rock formed from accumulated sediments. Examples are clay, sandstone, and limestone.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sedimentary rock - rock formed from consolidated clay sedimentssedimentary rock - rock formed from consolidated clay sediments
argillite - a sedimentary rock differing from shale in being bound by silica and from slate in having no slate cleavages
rock, stone - material consisting of the aggregate of minerals like those making up the Earth's crust; "that mountain is solid rock"; "stone is abundant in New England and there are many quarries"
arenaceous rock - a sedimentary rock composed of sand
argillaceous rock - a sedimentary rock formed from clay deposits
rudaceous rock - a sedimentary rock formed of coarse-grained material
slate - a fine-grained metamorphic rock that can be split into thin layers
limestone - a sedimentary rock consisting mainly of calcium that was deposited by the remains of marine animals
shale - a sedimentary rock formed by the deposition of successive layers of clay
References in periodicals archive ?
Erosion is the flux of particles from a sediment bed into the overlying water, and deposition is the flux of particles back to the sediment bed.
One of the most efficient and versatile types of modern dredges is the cutter suction dredge which uses a cutter located at the entrance to the suction pipe to excavate the sediment bed at the bottom of a ship channel.
A spokesman said: "A superb sediment bed full of prehistoric footprints on Formby beach is currently being studied by a team from Manchester University.
The sample was gripped by the hand and submerged into the sediments at the bottom of the river by pushing perpendicularly into the sediment bed, ensuring the container was totally full of sediments before pulling it out.
Next, a way was needed to relate various types of sediment bed forms created in flowing water--e.g., ripples, dunes and sand waves, and flat beds--to water depth and velocity.
The transfer of pollutants between the river water and the underlying sediment bed has important implications for the ultimate fate of pollutants in an aqueous environment (23).