seine


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Seine

 (sān, sĕn)
A river of northern France flowing about 770 km (480 mi) generally northwest to the Bay of the Seine, an inlet of the English Channel, near Le Havre. It has been an important commercial waterway since Roman times and has figured significantly in the histories of Paris, Rouen, and Le Havre.

seine

 (sān)
n.
A large fishing net made to hang vertically in the water by weights at the lower edge and floats at the top.
v. seined, sein·ing, seines
v.intr.
To fish with such a net.
v.tr.
To fish for or catch with such a net.

[Middle English, from Old English segne, from Germanic *sagina, from Latin sagēna, from Greek sagēnē.]

sein′er n.

seine

(seɪn)
n
(Angling) a large fishing net that hangs vertically in the water by means of floats at the top and weights at the bottom
vb
to catch (fish) using this net
[Old English segne, from Latin sagēna, from Greek sagēnē; related to Old High German segina, Old French saïne]

Seine

(seɪn; French sɛn)
n
(Placename) a river in N France, rising on the Plateau de Langres and flowing northwest through Paris to the English Channel: the second longest river in France, linked by canal with the Rivers Somme, Scheldt, Meuse, Rhine, Saône, and Loire. Length: 776 km (482 miles)

seine

(seɪn)

n., v. seined, sein•ing. n.
1. a fishing net that hangs vertically in the water, having floats at the upper edge and sinkers at the lower.
v.t.
2. to fish for or catch with a seine.
3. to use a seine in (water).
v.i.
4. to fish with a seine.
[before 950; Middle English seyne, Old English segne < West Germanic *sagina < Latin sagēna < Greek sagḗnē fishing net]
sein′er, n.

Seine

(seɪn, sɛn)

n.
a river in France, flowing NW through Paris to the English Channel. 480 mi. (773 km) long.

seine


Past participle: seined
Gerund: seining

Imperative
seine
seine
Present
I seine
you seine
he/she/it seines
we seine
you seine
they seine
Preterite
I seined
you seined
he/she/it seined
we seined
you seined
they seined
Present Continuous
I am seining
you are seining
he/she/it is seining
we are seining
you are seining
they are seining
Present Perfect
I have seined
you have seined
he/she/it has seined
we have seined
you have seined
they have seined
Past Continuous
I was seining
you were seining
he/she/it was seining
we were seining
you were seining
they were seining
Past Perfect
I had seined
you had seined
he/she/it had seined
we had seined
you had seined
they had seined
Future
I will seine
you will seine
he/she/it will seine
we will seine
you will seine
they will seine
Future Perfect
I will have seined
you will have seined
he/she/it will have seined
we will have seined
you will have seined
they will have seined
Future Continuous
I will be seining
you will be seining
he/she/it will be seining
we will be seining
you will be seining
they will be seining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been seining
you have been seining
he/she/it has been seining
we have been seining
you have been seining
they have been seining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been seining
you will have been seining
he/she/it will have been seining
we will have been seining
you will have been seining
they will have been seining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been seining
you had been seining
he/she/it had been seining
we had been seining
you had been seining
they had been seining
Conditional
I would seine
you would seine
he/she/it would seine
we would seine
you would seine
they would seine
Past Conditional
I would have seined
you would have seined
he/she/it would have seined
we would have seined
you would have seined
they would have seined
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seine - a French river that flows through the heart of Paris and then northward into the English ChannelSeine - a French river that flows through the heart of Paris and then northward into the English Channel
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
2.seine - a large fishnet that hangs vertically, with floats at the top and weights at the bottom
fishing net, fishnet - a net that will enclose fish when it is pulled in
purse seine - a seine designed to be set by two boats around a school of fish and then closed at the bottom by means of a line
Verb1.seine - fish with a seine; catch fish with a seine
fish - catch or try to catch fish or shellfish; "I like to go fishing on weekends"
Translations
nuotatanuotta

Seine

[seɪn] NSena m

seine

[seɪn] Njábega f

Seine

[ˈseɪn] n
the Seine → la Seine

seine

nWade f

Seine

[sɛn] n the Seinela Senna
References in classic literature ?
No, no—give me a good seine that’s fifty or sixty fathoms in length, with a jolly parcel of boatmen to crack their jokes the while, with Benjamin to steer, and let us haul them in by thousands; I call that fishing.
Up these little crooked streets they will murder a man for seven dollars and dump the body in the Seine.
Why, they induced General Quesnel to go there, and General Quesnel, who quitted his own house at nine o'clock in the evening, was found the next day in the Seine.
This distinguished scientist has expounded his views in a book entitled "Verschwinden und Seine Theorie," which has attracted some attention, "particularly," says one writer, "among the followers of Hegel, and mathematicians who hold to the actual existence of a so- called non-Euclidean space--that is to say, of space which has more dimensions than length, breadth, and thickness--space in which it would be possible to tie a knot in an endless cord and to turn a rubber ball inside out without 'a solution of its continuity,' or in other words, without breaking or cracking it.
Then he looked at the Seine at his feet, and a horrible temptation took possession of him:
They crossed to France, and ascended the Seine by steamboat, and then settled for a time in Paris.
The salmon, which are the prime fish of the Columbia, and as important to the piscatory tribes as are the buffaloes to the hunters of the prairies, do not enter the river until towards the latter part of May, from which time, until the middle of August, they abound and are taken in vast quantities, either with the spear or seine, and mostly in shallow water.
2] "Karl Strickland: sein Leben und seine Kunst," by Hugo Weitbrecht-Rotholz, Ph.
His body was taken out of the Seine in the disguise which I have described, nothing being found on him which revealed his name, his rank, or his place of abode.
He walked away through the city, beside the Seine and over it, and took the direction of the Rue d'Enfer.
I should be foreman of a factory, that is about all; and could drag a seine down street any day and catch a hundred better men than myself.
A murky red and yellow sky, and a rising mist from the Seine, denoted the approach of darkness.