Seismosaurus


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Noun1.Seismosaurus - genus of large herbivorous dinosaurs of Cretaceous found in western North America
reptile genus - a genus of reptiles
family Titanosauridae, Titanosauridae - herbivorous dinosaurs of the Cretaceous
ground-shaker, seismosaur - huge herbivorous dinosaur of the Cretaceous found in western North America
References in periodicals archive ?
(2006): Taxonomic status of Seismosaurus hallorum, a Late Jurassic sauropod dinosaur from New Mexico.
Answers: IGUANODON, APATOSAURUS, UTAHRAPTOR, ALLOSAURUS, SEISMOSAURUS, STEGOSAURUS, TYRANNOSAURUS REX, PARASAUROLOPHUS, GIGANOTOSAURUS, ANKYLOSAURUS, TRICERATOPS, SPINOSAURUS
Dinosaur history and models, including a 137-foot Seismosaurus. $3, hands-on dinosaur programs from $35.
If that ratio held for a 50,000-kilogram Seismosaurus, the beast would have carried more than half a ton of rocks in its immense belly, says Wings.
The 1.75-metre-long shoulder blade was found in the American state of Wyoming and is believed to be part of the 35-metre-long skeleton of a seismosaurus.
1 TYRANNOSAURUS REX tyrant lizard king 2 PSITTACOSAURUS __________ __________ 3 STRUTHIOMIMUS __________ __________ 4 CORYTHOSAURUS __________ __________ 5 SEISMOSAURUS _______________ __________ 6 TRICERATOPS ________ ________ ______ To answer the dinosaur riddle below, fill in the page number where each picture is found in this issue of Ranger Rick.
In the pages that follow, I hope to convey the rich story of how Seismosaurus ballorum--one of the biggest of all dinosaurs yet discovered--was reborn ...
THE longest dinosaur was a huge Diplodocus (Seismosaurus).
The record-breaking animal unoffcially dubbed seismosaurus, or "earth shaker," lived in the late Jurassic period, making these by far the oldest known proteins, says Spall, who described his team's work at a Geological Society of America meeting in Albuquerque.
At 110 feet long, 40 tons heavy, Seismosaurus, "earth shaker lizard,' has wrested this crown from two other contenders, Ultrasaurus and Supersaurus, unearthed in Colorado in the 1970s.
Gillette and his colleagues have discovered about 180 small stones buried right next to the skeleton of a seismosaurus, a 140- to 160-foot-long diplodocid dinosaur that they have been excavating for five years.