selachian

(redirected from Selachians)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Selachians: subclass Elasmobranchii, Elasmobranchs

selachian

(sɪˈleɪkɪən)
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Selachii (or Elasmobranchii), a large subclass of cartilaginous fishes including the sharks, rays, dogfish, and skates
n
(Animals) any fish belonging to the subclass Selachii
Also: elasmobranch
[C19: from New Latin Selachiī, from Greek selakhē a shark; related to Greek selas brightness]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.selachian - any of numerous fishes of the class Chondrichthyes characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton and placoid scales: sharksselachian - any of numerous fishes of the class Chondrichthyes characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton and placoid scales: sharks; rays; skates
cartilaginous fish, chondrichthian - fishes in which the skeleton may be calcified but not ossified
shark - any of numerous elongate mostly marine carnivorous fishes with heterocercal caudal fins and tough skin covered with small toothlike scales
ray - cartilaginous fishes having horizontally flattened bodies and enlarged winglike pectoral fins with gills on the underside; most swim by moving the pectoral fins
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of these latter worthies sported dental formulae more commonly associated with selachians such as the ragged-tooth shark (Odontaspis taunts) or some of the larger inshore members of the Sparidae, or sea-bream family, specifically the so-called poenskop or black mussel cracker (Cvmatoceps nasutus).
In addition, an upper horizon of the Lano quarry has yielded a shallow marine vertebrate association of late Maastrichtian age, which consists of selachians, actinopterygians, mosasaurids, and plesiosaurs (about 37 species).
Miocene fossil vertebrates, including selachians, turtles, crocodylians and diverse mammals (e.
The fossil fish material collected consists of isolated remains of selachians and actinopterygians and was obtained by dry sieving of unconsolidated sediments of the Cucullaea bed (Telm 4).
In elasmobranchs, these scales are known as placoid scales, or denticles, and in most selachians, a thin layer of mucus lies underneath the denticles to protect the epidermis.
These technical measures concern closed fishing zones, the obligation to use sorting grids and square-mesh nets, the ban on skimming in the North Sea and Atlantic and provisions for the protection of selachians and the use of driftnets.
Fish specimens were measured to the nearest mm following the methods of Compagno (1984) for selachians, De Buen (1959) for batoids and Hardy and Stehmann (1990) for chimaeras.