Self-exposure

Self`-ex`po´sure


n.1.The act of exposing one's self; the state of being so exposed.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in classic literature ?
The luxury of self-exposure kept her almost happy through the long evening.
There was a moment when my suspense on this point was so acute that I all but broke out with the question, and what kept it back was but a kind of instinctive recoil (lest it should be a mistake), from the last violence of self-exposure. She was such a subtle old witch that one could never tell where one stood with her.
Yet when all was ready, cans of alki in their solitary hands, the three things that had once been men hesitated, as if of old habit, and next betrayed shame as if at self-exposure.
Synopsis: "Self-Exposure" is the autobiography of celebrated American art photographer Ralph Gibson.
Expressing previously unspoken feelings for someone, owning up to a mistake, and other acts of self-exposure can bring on uncomfortable feelings of vulnerability.
How does one talk about oneself without either boring us with smug boastfulness or scandalising us with grovelling self-exposure? But we should not worry.
Every grieving Philip Roth reader who is Jewish understands that, as David Remnick of The New Yorker pointed out about the author who died Tuesday, "His sin was simple: he'd had the audacity to write about a Jewish kid as being flawed He had violated the tribal code on Jewish self-exposure."
The raw passion and self-exposure that were once embraced by rock is now felt by many artists in this neo-hip-hop/rock age.
In her message to mark the European Day to Protect Children against Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse -- marked on November 18 -- Kyriakides said this annual anniversary "offers a unique opportunity to recall the importance of strong laws and proactive measures against cyber-bullying, cyber-grooming, self-exposure and harmful content, as well as empowering children to protect themselves".
The total score may be subdivided into five factors: F1, coping and self-assertion with risk; F2, self-assertion in the expression of positive affect; F3, conversation and social confidence; F4, self-exposure to unknown people and new situations; and F5, self-control of aggressiveness (6).