self-medicate


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self-med·i·ca·tion

(sĕlf′mĕd′ĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. Medication of oneself without professional supervision to treat an illness or condition, as by using an over-the-counter drug or preparation.
2. The ingestion of a substance, such as alcohol, an illegal drug, or a non-prescribed medicine, as a conscious or unconscious means of coping with a psychological condition, such as anxiety or depression.

self′-med′i·cate′ v.
Translations

self-medicate

vi automedicarse, tomar un medicamento sin indicación por un médico
References in periodicals archive ?
At the time he had been advised by others to self-medicate on cannabis because of his fear of painkillers.
Citizens can buy any drugs in many pharmacies, which leads to people's self-medicate, the Minister noted.
She told the court: "He started using cannabis to self-medicate for the pain.
Patients with depression should not attempt to self-medicate.
Similarly, the use of prescription or nonprescription drugs to self-medicate mood or anxiety symptoms accounts for 20% of new-onset drug use disorders in this population, added Dr.
Yet 46% admit not going to the doctors if ill, with 29% choosing to self-medicate and 17% working through it, PushDoctor.
Sally tries to be all things to all people during her political campaign, but it soon becomes clear that her approach to certain policies could be her undoing, while Izzy is forced to come clean about her efforts to self-medicate.
Andrew Henley, defending, said Bent had used cocaine to self-medicate amid the "vacuum" left by the end of his football career.
The willingness of consumers in Hong Kong to self-medicate when faced with mild skin conditions supported the performance of dermatologicals throughout the year.
The category continues to benefit from Azerbaijani consumers' positive perception of OTC dermatological products, with many consumers willing to self-medicate for skin problems.
Dermatologicals benefited from German consumers' positive perception of OTC dermatological products, with many consumers being willing to self-medicate skin problems.
The nurse, who was based at a GP surgery, used the pills - known on the street as "blues" - to self-medicate.