Self-reverence

Related to Self-reverence: reverential

Self`-rev´er`ence


n.1.A reverent respect for one's self.
References in periodicals archive ?
He holds himself in such royal self-reverence as to make calls for him to step down appear useless.
Bishop Kang said that North Korea might be threatening war because "it cannot revitalize its economy and rise up from its destitute situation without foreign investment, but needs to maintain its self-respect or "self-reverence," which the bishop traces to the ideology of by Kim's dynasty.
Again turning to Calvin and Luther, Strier shows that the reformation critique of Aristotle's "magnanimity" and "proper pride" in antiquity had no place in Milton's theology of modesty, which values "self-reverence" as a "pious and just honouring of our selves" (262).
The result is a gem of a book whose lack of self-reverence contributes significantly to its readability and fun.
When their comportment, disposition, or self-reverence makes them less than credible and damages the integrated components of a society's self-image and constructive hopes, the resulting decline of credibility, relevance, and leadership impact is real and debilitating.
In highlighting both the beauty and vacuity of the material, the orchestra revels in the triviality and the self-reverence of popular and highbrow music, while being both serious and light-hearted.
(Most everyone with a TV did watch, but much of the comic brio was sacrificed in favor of self-reverence and psycho-babble.)
[23] This use of the phrase indicates that self-reverence includes an attention to behavior and carriage, but because Stevens is speaking as her daughter's "preceptress," this lesson falls within the context of female education.
Instead of God's wrath or the nation's scorn, the danger is self-condemnation, self-division, loss of self-reverence. Milton is compelled to write because he knows that he will not be able to affirm himself if he does not.(18) Self-regard is crucial.
What little there was came under the context of 'hygiene', with girls being instructed in the art of 'self-reverence, self-control and true modesty' and boys being warned about the temptations of 'factory and workshop life'.