poison pill

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poison pill

n. Informal
A strategy intended to make a hostile takeover of a corporation more difficult, as by granting of special rights to existing shareholders upon the occurrence of the purchase of a significant amount of stock by an intended acquirer.

poison pill

n
(Banking & Finance) finance a tactic used by a company fearing an unwelcome takeover bid, in which the value of the company is automatically reduced, as by the sale of an issue of shares having an option unfavourable to the bidders, if the bid is successful

poi′son pill`


n.
a means of preventing a hostile takeover of a corporation, as by issuing a new class of stock or guaranteeing benefits to employees, which would be a burden to a buyer.
[1985–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poison pill - the target company defends itself by making its stock less attractive to an acquirer
porcupine provision, shark repellent - a measure undertaken by a corporation to discourage unwanted takeover attempts
suicide pill - a poison pill with potentially catastrophic implications for the company it is intended to protect
References in periodicals archive ?
Football has so much money coming in from TV rights and sponsorship at the top end that it should easily be able to fund grassroots without selling the crown jewels.
Selling the crown jewels may seem like a good idea in order to get much-needed funds down to the grass roots of the game, however in my opinion facilities are only a part of the solution.
When I was there we ended up selling the crown jewels in terms of Victor Wanyama, Gary Hooper, Fraser Forster, Joe Ledley, Georgios Samaras.
Like many before him, Goldblatt is unhappy with the gradual takeover of English football by a mixture of chancers, gangsters and venture capitalists, a process he likens to selling the crown jewels. Private ownership, he believes, "trumps public provision and social needs", even though football clubs have been privately owned since the mid 19th century.