semiconductor

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sem·i·con·duc·tor

(sĕm′ē-kən-dŭk′tər, sĕm′ī-)
n.
1. Any of various solid crystalline substances, such as germanium or silicon, having electrical conductivity greater than insulators but less than good conductors, and used especially as a base material for microchips and other electronic devices.
2. An integrated circuit or other electronic component containing a semiconductor as a base material.

sem′i·con·duct′ing adj.

semiconductor

(ˌsɛmɪkənˈdʌktə)
n
1. (General Physics) a substance, such as germanium or silicon, that has an electrical conductivity that increases with temperature and is intermediate between that of a metal and an insulator. The behaviour may be exhibited by the pure substance (intrinsic semiconductor) or as a result of impurities (extrinsic semiconductor)
2. (Electronics)
a. a device, such as a transistor or integrated circuit, that depends on the properties of such a substance
b. (as modifier): a semiconductor diode.
ˌsemiconˈduction n

sem•i•con•duc•tor

(ˈsɛm i kənˌdʌk tər, ˈsɛm aɪ-)

n.
1. a substance, as silicon or germanium, with electrical conductivity intermediate between that of an insulator and a conductor.
2. a basic electronic component incorporating such a substance, used in communications equipment and in computers.
[1875–80]
sem`i•con•duct′ing, adj.

sem·i·con·duc·tor

(sĕm′ē-kən-dŭk′tər)
Any of various solid substances, such as silicon or germanium, that conduct electricity more easily than insulators but less easily than conductors. Semiconductors are able to do this because they have a small number of electrons that have escaped from the bonds between the atoms, leaving open spaces. Both the electrons and the open spaces can carry an electric current.

semiconductor

A substance with properties between those of an electrical insulator and a conductor at room temperature, but with conductivity modified by temperature and impurities; crucial in modern electronic devices.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.semiconductor - a substance as germanium or silicon whose electrical conductivity is intermediate between that of a metal and an insulatorsemiconductor - a substance as germanium or silicon whose electrical conductivity is intermediate between that of a metal and an insulator; its conductivity increases with temperature and in the presence of impurities
semiconductor device, semiconductor unit, semiconductor - a conductor made with semiconducting material
atomic number 32, Ge, germanium - a brittle grey crystalline element that is a semiconducting metalloid (resembling silicon) used in transistors; occurs in germanite and argyrodite
atomic number 14, Si, silicon - a tetravalent nonmetallic element; next to oxygen it is the most abundant element in the earth's crust; occurs in clay and feldspar and granite and quartz and sand; used as a semiconductor in transistors
conductor - a substance that readily conducts e.g. electricity and heat
2.semiconductor - a conductor made with semiconducting material
micro chip, microchip, microprocessor chip, silicon chip, chip - electronic equipment consisting of a small crystal of a silicon semiconductor fabricated to carry out a number of electronic functions in an integrated circuit
conductor - a device designed to transmit electricity, heat, etc.
crystal rectifier, junction rectifier, semiconductor diode, diode - a semiconductor that consists of a p-n junction
n-type semiconductor - a semiconductor in which electrical conduction is due chiefly to the movement of electrons
p-type semiconductor - a semiconductor in which electrical conduction is due chiefly to the movement of positive holes
thermal resistor, thermistor - a semiconductor device made of materials whose resistance varies as a function of temperature; can be used to compensate for temperature variation in other components of a circuit
electronic transistor, junction transistor, transistor - a semiconductor device capable of amplification
semiconducting material, semiconductor - a substance as germanium or silicon whose electrical conductivity is intermediate between that of a metal and an insulator; its conductivity increases with temperature and in the presence of impurities
Translations
polovodič
puolijohde
poluvodič

semiconductor

[ˌsemɪkənˈdʌktəʳ] Nsemiconductor m

semiconductor

[ˌsɛmikənˈdʌktər] nsemiconducteur m

semiconductor

[ˌsɛmɪkənˈdʌktəʳ] nsemiconduttore m
References in periodicals archive ?
He did his M.Phil in Semiconductor Physics from Center of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore and remained for the next one year as a Physics lecturer at University of Management and Technology, Lahore.
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Optical properties of thin films of titanium with transient layers on them, Semiconductor Physics, Quantum Electronics & Optoelectronics, 13: 231-234.

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