Semmelweis


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Sem·mel·weis

 (zĕm′əl-vīs′), Ignaz Philipp Originally Ignác Fülöp Semmelweis. 1818-1865.
Hungarian physician who determined that puerperal fever in a maternity clinic in Vienna was spread by doctors and students who examined pregnant women directly after performing autopsies. The mortality rate dropped after he required staff members to disinfect their hands before examinations.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Semmelweis

(ˈsɛməlˌvaɪs)
n
(Biography) Ignaz Philipp. 1818–65, Hungarian obstetrician, who discovered the cause of puerperal infection and pioneered the use of antiseptics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Ignaz Semmelweis was a Hungarian obstetrician practicing in the mid-1800's, years before Louis Pasteur came up with his germ theory and Joseph Lister popularized hand washing.
I am reminded of Ignaz Semmelweis, a Hungarian born physician who studied in Vienna to be an obstetrician and who was alive at the time of Florence Nightingale.
The President of Budapest's Semmelweis University, Tivadar Tulassay, has resigned over the plagiarism scandal with Hungarian Head of State Pal Schmitt.
Semmelweis, novelist Louis-Ferdinand Celine's 1924 fictionalized biography of controversial Vienna obstetrician Ignaz Semmelweis, is certainly a curiosity: a medical thesis (Celine was a hygienist) that reads alternately like fiction, prose poetry, and modernist screed.
I recall the doctor my Hungarian mother told me about--Ignaz Semmelweis (1818-1865).
It is the true story of Ignaz Semmelweis, a doctor at Vienna General Hospital in the mid-1800s.
"The Semmelweis Reflex" flows from the teaching of Dr.
A Hungarian physician named Ignac Semmelweis began to suspect that link and insisted that physicians wash their hands in a chemical solution before seeing each patient.
Lantos is an assistant professor in the Department of Respiratory Medicine, School of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary, where he is also head of the bronchology unit.