Seneca


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Sen·e·ca

 (sĕn′ĭ-kə)
n. pl. Seneca or Sen·e·cas
1. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting western New York from Seneca Lake to Lake Erie, with present-day populations in this same area and in southeast Ontario. The Seneca are the westernmost member of the original Iroquois confederacy.
2. The Iroquoian language of the Seneca.

[From Dutch Sennecaas, probably of Mahican origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Seneca

(ˈsɛnɪkə)
npl -cas or -ca
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people formerly living south of Lake Ontario; one of the Iroquois peoples
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Iroquoian family
[C19: from Dutch Sennecaas (plural), probably of Algonquian origin]

Seneca

(ˈsɛnɪkə)
n
1. (Biography) Lucius Annaeus (əˈniːəs), called the Younger. ?4 bc–65 ad, Roman philosopher, statesman, and dramatist; tutor and adviser to Nero. He was implicated in a plot to murder Nero and committed suicide. His works include Stoical essays on ethical subjects and tragedies that had a considerable influence on Elizabethan drama
2. (Biography) his father, Marcus (ˈmɑːkəs) or Lucius Annaeus, called the Elder or the Rhetorician. ?55 bc–?39 ad, Roman writer on oratory and history
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sen•e•ca

(ˈsɛn ɪ kə)

n., pl. -cas, (esp. collectively) -ca.
1. a member of an American Indian people orig. residing in W central New York: the westernmost of the Iroquois Five Nations.
2. the Iroquoian language of the Senecas.
[< New York Dutch Sennecaas, etc., orig. applied to the Oneida and, more generally, to all the Upper Iroquois (as opposed to the Mohawk), probably < an unattested Mahican name]

Sen•e•ca

(ˈsɛn ɪ kə)

n.
Lucius Annaeus, c4 B.C. – A.D. 65, Roman philosopher and playwright.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Seneca - Roman statesman and philosopher who was an advisor to NeroSeneca - Roman statesman and philosopher who was an advisor to Nero; his nine extant tragedies are modeled on Greek tragedies (circa 4 BC - 65 AD)
2.Seneca - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living in New York State south of Lake Ontario
Iroquois - any member of the warlike North American Indian peoples formerly living in New York State; the Iroquois League were allies of the British during the American Revolution
3.Seneca - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Seneca
Iroquoian, Iroquoian language, Iroquois - a family of North American Indian languages spoken by the Iroquois
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
seneca
seneca
Seneca
seneca
senecat
SénécasTsonnontouan
seneca
senecaene
senekowie
senecas

Seneca

[ˈsenɪkə] NSéneca
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Seneca

[ˈsɛnɪkə] nSeneca m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Their chief models for tragedy were the plays of the first-century Roman Seneca, who may or may not have been identical with the philosopher who was the tutor of the Emperor Nero.
A direct imitation of Seneca, famous as the first tragedy in English on classical lines, was the 'Gorboduc, or Ferrex and Porrex,' of Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville, acted in 1562.
Nay, Seneca adds niceness and satiety: Cogita quamdiu eadem feceris; mori velle, non tantum fortis aut miser, sed etiam fastidiosus potest.
The most beautiful is the Seneca, named after a Grecian king.
In the state of New York, it is called Seneca Oil, from being found near the Seneca lake.
"Philosophy," he says, "can never replace religion." Only, one cannot see why it might not replace a religion such as his: a religion, after all, much like Seneca's.
This lecture he enriched with many valuable quotations from the antients, particularly from Seneca; who hath indeed so well handled this passion, that none but a very angry man can read him without great pleasure and profit.
The transition is a keen one, I assure you, from the schoolmaster to a sailor, and requires a strong decoction of Seneca and the Stoics to enable you to grin and bear it.
de Port Royal, and he had made a collection, en passant, in the society of Athos and Aramis, of many morsels of Seneca and Cicero, translated by them, and applied to the uses of common life.
I ask you, Messer Cicero, and Messer Seneca, copies of whom, all dog's-eared, I behold scattered on the floor, what profits it me to know, better than any governor of the mint, or any Jew on the Pont aux Changeurs, that a golden crown stamped with a crown is worth thirty-five unzains of twenty-five sous, and eight deniers parisis apiece, and that a crown stamped with a crescent is worth thirty-six unzains of twenty-six sous, six deniers tournois apiece, if I have not a single wretched black liard to risk on the double-six!
{*2} Ils ecrivaient sur la Philosophie (Cicero, Lucretius, Seneca) mais c'etait la Philosophie Grecque.
'We understand THAT A SEVERE RENCONTRE CAME OFF a few days since in the Seneca Nation, between Mr.