Seneca Falls

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Seneca Falls

A village of west-central New York on the Seneca River east-southeast of Rochester. The first women's rights convention was held here in 1848.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elizabeth Cady Stanton is among the organizers of the first women's rights convention, in Seneca Falls, New York.
1848: At a convention in Seneca Falls, New York state, female rights campaigner Amelia Bloomer introduced "bloomers" to the world, which she described as "the lower part of a rational dress".
And this month, Karolyn becomes Hoylake Community Cinema's latest celebrity patron, as volunteer Mark Howard explains: "Last December, at the end of our Christmas screening of It's a Wonderful Life, I asked the audience to remain seated before making a live Skype connection to the launch party of the It's a Wonderful Life Festival in Seneca Falls, New York State.
Anthony: A Friendship That Changed the World began in May 1851 when their mutual friend Amelia Bloomer introduced them on a street corner in Seneca Falls, New York.
In addition, if there is less material to haul, there will be fewer driving hours contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, with some of town's trash being trucked several hours away to a landfill in Seneca Falls, New York.
1848: At a convention in Seneca Falls, New York |state, female rights campaigner Amelia Bloomer introduced ''bloomers'' to the world, which she described as ''the lower part of a rational dress''.
In the process, as Lisa Tetrault convincingly argues, a small, local, and undoubtedly significant 1848 convention held in Seneca Falls, New York, assumed titanic stature for later generations, and Anthony, who had attended neither it nor a second convention held in Rochester shortly afterward acquired historic monumentality as the "mother" of the suffrage movement.
In 1848, a pioneer women's rights convention convened in Seneca Falls, New York.
1848 Elizabeth Cady Stanton helps organize the first women's rights convention, in Seneca Falls, New York.
is one of 11 women inducted this year into the National Women's Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York.
For example, suffragists saw in World War I an opportunity for enfranchisement and a chance to break with the Seneca Falls Movement (a women's suffrage movement that grew out of an assembly held at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848).
She was instrumental in establishing the American suffrage movement and organized the women's convention in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848.