sensism


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sensism

(ˈsɛnsɪzəm)
n
devotion to sensuality; desire for sensual pleasure
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
They never understood the eighteenth century; and, holding the chief places of influence, they suffered the world they themselves had educated, to lapse in philosophy into shallow sensism, and in religion into the crudest infidelity.
In this connection, Brownson's religious philosophy identifies a universal and absolute formula by which "sensism [i.e.
Rosmini, in fact, severely criticized the philosophical current of sensism exemplified by Locke or Condillac.
He has an excellent section tracing the problem of the good in modern philosophy, showing how Hume's sensism and utilitarianism, Kant's deontological ethics of abstract duty, and Scheler's emotivism on values all fail to acknowledge the truth about the good, as well as man's capacity to reach it (at least to some extent), and thus to be responsible for it.
214), Lonergan claims that this visualist tendency can be found in "materialism, empiricism, positivism, sensism, phenomenalism, behaviorism, pragmatism." More recently, the visualist tendency in Western philosophic thought has been studied by Andrea Wilson Nightingale in Spectacles of Truth in Classical Greek Philosophy: Theoria in Its Cultural Context (2004) and others.
Spain's primary comportment is sensism, which is possible only because lived reality does, in fact, have a patent side.
Spain needs to overturn its historical way of being, its one-sided sensism, in order to acquire meaningful, progressive culture.
Executives explained that this is part of the company's shift toward "sensism," the relationship between the senses and well-being.
The sustaining framework of Hookway's analysis is Peirce's "critical common sensism," the pragmatic version of the Scottish philosophy that arrived at Harvard in the early part of the nineteenth century.
In contrast to the psychological sensism of strict empiricism that is a partial sketch of human knowledge, what it is to be x (as opposed to something that is x) is what metaphysical empiricism posits as the proper object of human cognition, the immaterial "what" (quidditas) of material realities.