Sephardi


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Se·phar·di

 (sə-fär′dē)
n. pl. Se·phar·dim (-dĭm)
A descendant of the Jews who lived in Spain and Portugal during the Middle Ages until persecution culminating in expulsion in 1492 forced them to leave.

[Medieval Hebrew səpāraddî, Spaniard, from səpārad, Spain, adoption of Hebrew səpārad, placename of disputed location (mentioned in Obadiah 20).]

Se·phar′dic (-dĭk) adj.

Sephardi

(sɪˈfɑːdiː)
n, pl -dim (-dɪm)
1. (Judaism)
a. a Jew of Spanish, Portuguese, or North African descent
b. (loosely) any Oriental Jew
2. (Judaism) the pronunciation of Hebrew used by these Jews, and of Modern Hebrew as spoken in Israel
3. (Judaism) (modifier) of or pertaining to the Sephardim, esp to their liturgy and ritual
4. (Judaism) (modifier) of or pertaining to the liturgy adopted by certain European, esp Chassidic, communities who believe it to be more authentic but nonetheless differing from the genuine Oriental liturgy
[C19: from Late Hebrew, from Hebrew sepharad a region mentioned in Obadiah 20, thought to have been Spain]
Seˈphardic adj

Se•phar•di

(səˈfɑr di, -fɑrˈdi)

n., pl. -phar•dim (-ˈfɑr dɪm, -fɑrˈdim)
a Jew of Spanish or Portuguese origin or ancestry. Compare Ashkenazi.
[1850–55; < Modern Hebrew Səphāraddī < Hebrew Səphāradh (Biblical region assumed to be Spain)]
Se•phar′dic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sephardi - a Jew who is of Spanish or Portuguese or North African descent
Jew, Hebrew, Israelite - a person belonging to the worldwide group claiming descent from Jacob (or converted to it) and connected by cultural or religious ties
Translations

Sephardi

[seˈfɑːdɪ] N (Sephardim (pl)) [seˈfɑːdɪm]sefardí mf, sefardita mf
References in periodicals archive ?
Correspondingly, many Jewish Israelis view themselves as either "religious" or "secular." Many other Israeli citizens, particularly among those of Mizrahi and/or Sephardi background, carve out what they perceive to be a middle ground between religion and secularity by referring to themselves as "traditional"that is, neither ultra-secular (that is to say, anti-religious in principle), nor ultra-observant of Halakhah.
The Sephardi chief rabbi of Jerusalem said gay people cannot be religious Jews and called homosexuality "a wild lust that needs to be overcome." Rabbi Shlomo Amar made the remarks last week during a sermon.
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Soon, the language of the Sephardi community will be an artifact of the past, which we will be reminded of when seeing its script on tombstones in Turkish-Jewish cemeteries.
The Welfare Party had a rather strong and centralized party organization with its highly motivated networks assigned even at neighborhood level, while Shas benefited from ultra-Orthodox Sephardi rabbis and yeshiva students to channel mobilization.
With more than 100 albums, in-depth essays and liner notes, oral histories, a 13-episode radio series hosted by Leonard Nimoy, and a vast collection of videos, the collection represents more than 200 composers and spans genres ranging from classical, klezmer and cantorial to Sephardi, Yiddish theater, jazz and more.
Together they cover the historical background of the Caribbean Sephardi diaspora, authority and community in the Dutch Caribbean, material and visual culture, Jews and slave society, reassessing the geographical boundaries of Caribbean Jewry, personal narratives, and the formation of contemporary Caribbean Jewry.
SEVILLE, Spain - Descendants of Muslims exiled from Spain in the 17th century have decried the granting of citizenship to descendants of exiled Jews as racist, a spokesman said.Spain's Justice Ministry recently extended citizenship to those who could prove familial relationships to Sephardi Jews who were expelled from Spain in 1492, but withheld a similar grant to descendants of Moriscos, Spanish Muslims who converted to Christianity but were expelled to North Africa in 1609.
Israel has two chief rabbis, one Ashkenazi and one Sephardi, whose responsibilities include running the rabbinical courts and regulating the food supervision industry.