French Revolution

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Related to September Massacres: National Convention, Reign of Terror

French Revolution

n
(Historical Terms) the anticlerical and republican revolution in France from 1789 until 1799, when Napoleon seized power
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.French Revolution - the revolution in France against the BourbonsFrench Revolution - the revolution in France against the Bourbons; 1789-1799
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Französische Revolution
Révolution française
References in periodicals archive ?
1666: Great Fire of London begins at 2am in Pudding Lane, 80% of London is destroyed 1792: In Paris rampaging mobs slaughter three Roman Catholic bishops, more than 200 priests, and prisoners believed to be royalist sympathizers during the September Massacres of the French Revolution 1902: "A Trip To The Moon", the first ever sci-fi film, is released 1944: Holocaust diarist Anne Frank is sent to Auschwitz concentration camp 1945: Japanese officials sign the act of unconditional surrender, finally bringing to an end six years of world war 1979: Police discover the body of a young woman - later confirmed to be the 12th victim of the Yorkshire Ripper - in an alleyway near the centre of Bradford 1985: It is announced that the Titanic has been found by a U.S.
1796 - The September Massacres, which killed some 1,200 people, begin when an armed band attacks prisoners while they were being transferred between jails in Paris.
The French Revolution led to regicide, the September Massacres, the Terror, the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of Catholics in the Vendee region of France, and almost two decades of Napoleonic wars.