servants


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Related to servants: Public servants

servants

  • livery - A company's distinctive color scheme or emblem on vehicles is called the livery; livery first referred to the dispensing of clothes, food, or provisions to servants.
  • gardyloo - A warning cry derived from French gare de l'eau, "beware of the water"—referring to the water and slops that were once thrown by servants from higher stories of a building onto the street.
  • servants' quarters - In Victorian days, they were usually referred to as below stairs; above stairs was the realm of the family.
  • family - First referred to the servants of a household and then to both the servants and the descendants of a common ancestor. It comes from Latin familia, "household; household servants," which came from another Latin term, famulus, "servant." It was not until 1667 that the term was used specifically for parents and their children.
References in classic literature ?
The choice of servants is of no little importance to a prince, and they are good or not according to the discrimination of the prince.
When, therefore, servants, and princes towards servants, are thus disposed, they can trust each other, but when it is otherwise, the end will always be disastrous for either one or the other.
In London I was used to servants, and in moments of irritation would ring for them furiously, though doubtless my manner changed as they opened the door.
But now when we could have servants for ourselves I shrank from the thought.
He appears to be a strange old man, whose whims and fancies amuse his servants as well as his friends.
But I think I can still hold my place against the other servants -- I think I can still look the parlor-maid whom Admiral Bartram wants.
And for the most part, the good such servants receive, is after the model of their own fortune; but the hurt they sell for that good, is after the model of their master's fortune.
The Sergeant politely answered that he would take my presence as a favour, having something to say about the servants in general, and having found my experience in that quarter already of some use to him.
My good servants, who have been with me for years, have, I am ashamed to say, had their boxes and rooms searched already by the other officer.
Then the cook sent three servants after them, who were to run and overtake the children.
And now the old cook herself got on her legs, and went with the three servants in pursuit of the children.
As these games were very silently conducted, notwithstanding the magnitude of the interests involved, Mr Swiveller began to think that on those evenings when Mr and Miss Brass were out (and they often went out now) he heard a kind of snorting or hard-breathing sound in the direction of the door, which it occurred to him, after some reflection, must proceed from the small servant, who always had a cold from damp living.