Suetonius

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Sue·to·ni·us

 (swē-tō′nē-əs) Full name Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus. fl. second century ad.
Roman historian whose major work, Lives of the Caesars, is an account of the lives of the first 12 Roman emperors.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Suetonius

(swiːˈtəʊnɪəs)
n
(Biography) full name Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus. 75–150 ad, Roman biographer and historian, whose chief works were Concerning Illustrious Men and The Lives of the Caesars (from Julius Caesar to Domitian)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sue•to•ni•us

(swɪˈtoʊ ni əs)

n.
(Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus) A.D. 75–150, Roman historian.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

Suetonius

[swiːˈtəʊnɪəs] NSuetonio
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Suetonius

nSueton(ius) m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
He also weaves in information from Seutonius and Tacitus, contemporary historians of the conquerors.
This volume examines how urban Latin and Greek literature reacted to politics, often in subtle ways perhaps analogous to the techniques employed by writers in the Soviet Union working under a watchful censorship, in the period extending from the 50s BCE to approximately 120 CE--from Lucretius to Seutonius or, alternatively, from the age of Caesar to that of Hadrian.
Much writing that was contemporary has been lost, but some that is missing in the original comes to us through the filters of later authors such as Plutarch and Seutonius, who wrote during the apogee of the Empire.
The first recorded navigators of the Strait were Roman soldiers of the 14th and 20th Legions who marched to Llanfairisgaer on the mainland under Seutonius Paulinus in AD 61 and invaded Anglesey in flat bottomed boats they had brought with them.