severance

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sev·er·ance

 (sĕv′ər-əns, sĕv′rəns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of severing.
b. The condition of being severed.
2. Separation; partition.
3. Severance pay.

severance

(ˈsɛvərəns)
n
1. the act of severing or state of being severed
2. a separation
3. (Law) law the division into separate parts of a joint estate, contract, etc

sev•er•ance

(ˈsɛv ər əns, ˈsɛv rəns)

n.
1. the act of severing or the state of being severed.
2. a breaking off, as of a friendship.
3. Law. a division of liabilities, provisions, etc., into parts; removal of a part from the whole.
4. Also called sev′erance pay`. money, exclusive of wages, etc., paid to an employee who is dismissed for reasons beyond the employee's control.
[1375–1425; < Anglo-French; see sever, -ance]

severance

1. the act or process of severing or separating.
2. the state or condition of being severed or separated, as in the ending of a relationship.
See also: Separation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.severance - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions)severance - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions); "they hoped to avoid a break in relations"
schism - the formal separation of a church into two churches or the withdrawal of one group over doctrinal differences
breakup, separation, detachment - coming apart
2.severance - the act of severing
cutting, cut - the act of cutting something into parts; "his cuts were skillful"; "his cutting of the cake made a terrible mess"

severance

noun
The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
Translations
قَطْع ، فَصْل، فَصْم
amputacepřerušení
adskillelse
ero
elvágás
skilnaîur
loslossnijdenontslagvergoedingscheidingzijn

severance

[ˈsevərəns]
A. Nruptura f (Ind) → despido m
B. CPD severance pay Nindemnización f por despido

severance

[ˈsɛvərəns] n [relations] → rupture fseverance package nindemnités fpl de départseverance pay nindemnité f de licenciement

severance

n
(= cutting through)Durchtrennen nt; (violently) → Durchschlagen nt; (= cutting off)Abtrennen nt; (violently) → Abschlagen nt; (fig: = breaking off) (of ties)Lösen nt; (of relations, links, friendship)Abbruch m; (of communications)Unterbrechung f
(also severance package, Econ) → Abfindung f, → Abfindungspaket nt

severance

[ˈsɛvərns] n (frm) (of relations) → rottura

sever

(ˈsevə) verb
1. to put an end to. He severed relations with his family.
2. to cut or break off. His arm was severed in the accident.
ˈseverance noun
References in periodicals archive ?
He further asked for an order reversing the purported disengagement through a letter dated April 6, 2018 for non compliance with the terms and conditions of service regulating his employment and an order directing Lead City University to pay him the 7.5 per cent staff severance benefit scheme, allowances, arrears of salaries and other entitlements from the date he was employed by the institution in compliance with the terms of agreement and condition of service.
For example, employers are limited in how much (if anything) they can deduct for contributions to fund a severance benefit. This is particularly true in cases where an employer previously provided no severance benefits.
* One week's salary per year of service is the most common tenure-based severance benefit for exempt and non-exempt employees, while two weeks is the median for officers and other executives.
The counsel argued that the defendants relied heavily on ICPC's Exhibit 3 to justify the payment of severance benefits to Dr Gwarzo whereas the document never mentioned severance benefit.
In a similar cash management strategy using a DB program, another large firm with more than 5,000 employees used its plan to provide a more generous severance benefit than would otherwise have been possible.
said it will pay a cash severance benefit of $250,000 to President and Chief Operating Officer Danford F.
Where those benefits are provided, the most common severance benefit payable is three times salary plus annual bonus (almost 70 percent of the cases), followed by two times salary plus bonus.
The best protection an executive can have is an employment contract that guarantees the executive cannot be fired except for cause and also guarantees him or her a generous severance benefit in the event dismissal occurs anyway, without cause.
While some employers offer this kind of severance benefit, the wage laws don't require severance pay at all.
According to the ASCSN, apart from the fact that Gwarzo approved and paid himself a humongous sum of N105 million as severance benefit while still serving as director-general of SEC, Mr Gwarzo was also involved in other financial scams such as compelling the Commission to be awarding contracts to companies he still serves as director.
This rule applies in any week that the departing employee collects a severance benefit that equals or exceeds the maximum unemployment insurance weekly benefit (currently $420).