severance

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sev·er·ance

 (sĕv′ər-əns, sĕv′rəns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of severing.
b. The condition of being severed.
2. Separation; partition.
3. Severance pay.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

severance

(ˈsɛvərəns)
n
1. the act of severing or state of being severed
2. a separation
3. (Law) law the division into separate parts of a joint estate, contract, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sev•er•ance

(ˈsɛv ər əns, ˈsɛv rəns)

n.
1. the act of severing or the state of being severed.
2. a breaking off, as of a friendship.
3. Law. a division of liabilities, provisions, etc., into parts; removal of a part from the whole.
4. Also called sev′erance pay`. money, exclusive of wages, etc., paid to an employee who is dismissed for reasons beyond the employee's control.
[1375–1425; < Anglo-French; see sever, -ance]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

severance

1. the act or process of severing or separating.
2. the state or condition of being severed or separated, as in the ending of a relationship.
See also: Separation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.severance - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions)severance - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions); "they hoped to avoid a break in relations"
schism - the formal separation of a church into two churches or the withdrawal of one group over doctrinal differences
breakup, separation, detachment - coming apart
2.severance - the act of severing
cutting, cut - the act of cutting something into parts; "his cuts were skillful"; "his cutting of the cake made a terrible mess"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

severance

noun
The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
قَطْع ، فَصْل، فَصْم
amputacepřerušení
adskillelse
ero
elvágás
skilnaîur
loslossnijdenontslagvergoedingscheidingzijn

severance

[ˈsevərəns]
A. Nruptura f (Ind) → despido m
B. CPD severance pay Nindemnización f por despido
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

severance

[ˈsɛvərəns] n [relations] → rupture fseverance package nindemnités fpl de départseverance pay nindemnité f de licenciement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

severance

n
(= cutting through)Durchtrennen nt; (violently) → Durchschlagen nt; (= cutting off)Abtrennen nt; (violently) → Abschlagen nt; (fig: = breaking off) (of ties)Lösen nt; (of relations, links, friendship)Abbruch m; (of communications)Unterbrechung f
(also severance package, Econ) → Abfindung f, → Abfindungspaket nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

severance

[ˈsɛvərns] n (frm) (of relations) → rottura
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sever

(ˈsevə) verb
1. to put an end to. He severed relations with his family.
2. to cut or break off. His arm was severed in the accident.
ˈseverance noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
His name she had obviously never used during their separation, and her dignified sense of their total severance was shown not much less by this abstention than by the hardships she had chosen to undergo (of which he now learnt for the first time) rather than apply to his father for more funds.
But when it is a beloved and intimate human being that is dying, besides this horror at the extinction of life there is a severance, a spiritual wound, which like a physical wound is sometimes fatal and sometimes heals, but always aches and shrinks at any external irritating touch.
But, on examination, I found that, as for logic, its syllogisms and the majority of its other precepts are of avail- rather in the communication of what we already know, or even as the art of Lully, in speaking without judgment of things of which we are ignorant, than in the investigation of the unknown; and although this science contains indeed a number of correct and very excellent precepts, there are, nevertheless, so many others, and these either injurious or superfluous, mingled with the former, that it is almost quite as difficult to effect a severance of the true from the false as it is to extract a Diana or a Minerva from a rough block of marble.
On the day when in the drawing room of the house in Arbaty Street she had gone up to him in her brown dress, and given herself to him without a word--on that day, at that hour, there took place in her heart a complete severance from all her old life, and a quite different, new, utterly strange life had begun for her, while the old life was actually going on as before.
The dissolution of allegiance to the British crown, the severance of the colonies from the British Empire, and their actual existence as independent States, were definitively established in fact, by war and peace.
Three days had elapsed since the affair with the Baron, and I could bear the severance no longer.
He went to study in Paris with the determination that when he provincial home again he would settle in some provincial town as a general practitioner, and resist the irrational severance between medical and surgical knowledge in the interest of his own scientific pursuits, as well as of the general advance: he would keep away from the range of London intrigues, jealousies, and social truckling, and win celebrity, however slowly, as Jenner had done, by the independent value of his work.
But for him, perhaps, this severance need never have taken place.
Your dear friend followed me to my retreat, and was very droll on the severance of the connection; though he was sorry, too, for the excellent people (in their way the best he had ever met), and deplored the necessity of breaking mere house-flies on the wheel.
'Circumstances beyond my individual control have, for a considerable lapse of time, effected a severance of that intimacy which, in the limited opportunities conceded to me in the midst of my professional duties, of contemplating the scenes and events of the past, tinged by the prismatic hues of memory, has ever afforded me, as it ever must continue to afford, gratifying emotions of no common description.
The sight of their obviously sick father must have been especially terrifying to the Severances' youngest sons, seven-year-old John Long and twelve-year-old Erasmus Darwin.

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