Seveso


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Related to Seveso: Seveso Directive, Seveso disaster

Seveso

(sɛˈveɪsəʊ)
n
(Placename) a town in N Italy, near Milan: evacuated in 1976 after contamination by a poisonous cloud of dioxin gas released from a factory
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Among those with relatively high exposure at Seveso (zones A and B), all-cancer mortality in the 20-year postaccident period and all-cancer incidence in the 15-year postaccident period failed to exhibit significant departures from the expected (Bertazzi et al.
The Seveso II Directive is the legal and technical instrument through which the EU carries out its obligations in that context.
On 10 July 1976, as a result of a chemical explosion, residents of Seveso, Italy, experienced the highest levels of TCDD exposure experienced by a human population.
The EU executive is in contact with the German authorities to make sure that the land-use planning rules of the EU's Seveso II Directive (on the control of major accident hazards involving dangerous substances) are respected.
Twenty-five years after the dioxin accident in Seveso, Italy, 48 subjects from the contaminated areas (zones A and B) and in patches lightly contaminated (zone R) were recruited for the examination of dental and oral aberrations.
In 1976, a chemical plant explosion near Seveso, Italy, resulted in the highest known exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in residential populations.
The Commission is in contact with the German authorities to make sure that the land-use planning rules of the EU's Seveso II Directive (on the control of major accident hazards involving dangerous substances) are respected.
Synthron is accused of failing to respect industrial standards imposed through the Seveso 2 Directives: exceeding waste stocks (400 tonnes instead of 80), absence of a second fire access, presence of plastic drums close to inflammable stocks, overflowing tanks and careless cleaning.
In 1976 in Seveso, Italy, a community-wide exposure to high concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) occurred after an explosion at a plant that manufactured the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (Mocarelli et al.
Another case for the ECJ concerns the failure to comply with Council Directive 96/82/EC on limiting risks following major industrial accidents involving dangerous substances known as the Seveso II Directive.