Seville


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Se·ville

 (sə-vĭl′)
A city of southwest Spain on the Guadalquivir River north-northeast of Cádiz. An important settlement under the Romans, Vandals, and Visigoths, it was conquered by the Moors in ad 712 and later taken by Ferdinand III of Castile, who made it his royal residence in 1248. The city especially prospered after the discovery of the New World and served as the chief port of colonial trade until the early 1700s.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Seville

(səˈvɪl)
n
(Placename) a port in SW Spain, on the Guadalquivir River: chief town of S Spain under the Vandals and Visigoths (5th–8th centuries); centre of Spanish colonial trade (16th–17th centuries); tourist centre. Pop: 709 975 (2003 est). Ancient name: Hispalis Spanish name: Sevilla
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Se•ville

(səˈvɪl)

n.
a port in SW Spain, on the Guadalquivir River. 668,356. Spanish, Se•vi•lla (sɛˈvi lyɑ)
Se•vil′lian (-yən) adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Seville - a city in southwestern SpainSeville - a city in southwestern Spain; a major port and cultural center; the capital of bullfighting in Spain
Espana, Kingdom of Spain, Spain - a parliamentary monarchy in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula; a former colonial power
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Seville

[səˈvɪl]
A. NSevilla f
B. CPD Seville orange Nnaranja f amarga
Seville orange tree N (Brit) → naranjo m amargo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Seville

nSevilla nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Seville

[səˈvɪl] nSiviglia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"We might be seeing it all this spring--even the Easter ceremonies at Seville," he urged, exaggerating his demands in the hope of a larger concession.
"Easter in Seville? And it will be Lent next week!" she laughed.
At the door were standing two young women, girls of the district as they call them, on their way to Seville with some carriers who had chanced to halt that night at the inn; and as, happen what might to our adventurer, everything he saw or imaged seemed to him to be and to happen after the fashion of what he read of, the moment he saw the inn he pictured it to himself as a castle with its four turrets and pinnacles of shining silver, not forgetting the drawbridge and moat and all the belongings usually ascribed to castles of the sort.
Not the Inquisition of Seville, nor the German Vehm-gericht, nor the Secret Societies of Italy, were ever able to put a more formidable machinery in motion than that which cast a cloud over the State of Utah.
He looked up through the green leaves at the blue sky, bedappled with white, fleecy clouds, and wondered whether she guessed that his appearance here, his ownership of Iris, the studious care with which he had placed himself in the hands of a Seville Row tailor were all for her sake.
"You must go to Seville," she said--she spoke a little broken English.
I have heard two very intelligent critics speak of Murillo's Immaculate Conception (now in the museum at Seville,) within the past few days.
"By Saint James!" said he, "if ye fall this day ye fall by no mean hands, for the flower of the knighthood of Castile ride under the banner of Don Tello, with the chivalry of Asturias, Toledo, Leon, Cordova, Galicia, and Seville. I see the guidons of Albornez, Cacorla, Rodriguez, Tavora, with the two great orders, and the knights of France and of Aragon.
Lowest of all, a compact leaden-vault enshrined the sweet wine and a stock of cordials: whence issued whispers of Seville Orange, Lemon, Almond, and Caraway-seed.
He aims to build on Seville's reputation as a solid and wide-ranging Euro showcase.
MADRID, Aug 11 (KUNA) -- Still standing in Seville, the Torre del Oro (golden tower) evoked the Islamic past of the southern Spanish city.
The very symbol of Seville, which dominates its skyline, shows these influences.