William Shakespeare

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Noun1.William Shakespeare - English poet and dramatist considered one of the greatest English writers (1564-1616)William Shakespeare - English poet and dramatist considered one of the greatest English writers (1564-1616)
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References in classic literature ?
A German gentleman in the train had said that a Shakespearian play was an appreciated treat in Germany and that we should find the house filled.
In an- other bill he was the "world-renowned Shakespearian tragedian, Garrick the Younger, of Drury Lane, Lon- don." In other bills he had a lot of other names and done other wonderful things, like finding water and gold with a "divining-rod," "dissipating witch spells," and so on.
Others had made the same attempt, and there was a household of Blenkers--an intense and voluble mother, and three blowsy daughters who imitated her--where one met Edwin Booth and Patti and William Winter, and the new Shakespearian actor George Rignold, and some of the magazine editors and musical and literary critics.
I had just finished sweeping the cabin, and had been inveigled by Wolf Larsen into a discussion of Hamlet, his favourite Shakespearian character, when Johansen descended the companion stairs followed by Johnson.
And here, with all possible deference to Bruno as a Shakespearian critic, I must express my opinion that the poet did not mean his three great tragic heroes to be so strangely alike in their personal habits; nor do I believe that he would have accepted the faculty of turning head-over-heels as any proof at all of royal descent.
Do you see what day it is?" he added, tearing a leaflet from a Shakespearian calendar, as I drained my glass.
This applies to those Shakespearians who concern themselves with the playwright's work in translation, but also to representatives of Translation Studies, where Shakespeare's work in other languages often serves to illustrate translation theories.
This important collection of European studies of Shakespeare is a record of an international, or rather intercultural, conference held at Murcia, Spain, organized by a number of scholars particularly interested in a dialogue between English-speaking and 'foreign' Shakespearians. The essays cover a wide range of issues, made more relevant by their context, even where they appear as simple case studies.
In his polemic, Sohmer points to the specialization of Shakespearians which defines not only a competency but also limitations.