shamrock

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sham·rock

 (shăm′rŏk′)
n.
1. A plant having compound leaves with three small leaflets, especially a clover or wood sorrel.
2. The compound leaf of one of these plants.
3. A representation of one of these plants or leaves, used as a national emblem of Ireland.

[Irish Gaelic seamróg, diminutive of seamar, clover, from Middle Irish semar; probably akin to Old Norse smári, clover, and of non-Indo-European substrate origin.]

shamrock

(ˈʃæmˌrɒk)
n
(Plants) a plant having leaves divided into three leaflets, variously identified as the wood sorrel, red clover, white clover, and black medick: the national emblem of Ireland
[C16: from Irish Gaelic seamrōg, diminutive of seamar clover]

sham•rock

(ˈʃæm rɒk)

n.
any of several trifoliate plants, as the wood sorrel, Oxalis acetosella, or a small, pink-flowered clover, Trifolium repens minus, but esp. Trifolium procumbens, a small, yellow-flowered clover: the national emblem of Ireland.
[1565–75; < Irish seamróg]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shamrock - creeping European clover having white to pink flowers and bright green leavesshamrock - creeping European clover having white to pink flowers and bright green leaves; naturalized in United States; widely grown for forage
clover, trefoil - a plant of the genus Trifolium
2.shamrock - Eurasian plant with heart-shaped trifoliate leaves and white purple-veined flowersshamrock - Eurasian plant with heart-shaped trifoliate leaves and white purple-veined flowers
oxalis, sorrel, wood sorrel - any plant or flower of the genus Oxalis
3.shamrock - clover native to Ireland with yellowish flowersshamrock - clover native to Ireland with yellowish flowers; often considered the true or original shamrock
clover, trefoil - a plant of the genus Trifolium
Translations
trojlístek
kolmiapila

shamrock

[ˈʃæmrɒk] Ntrébol m

shamrock

[ˈʃæmrɒk] ntrèfle m (emblème national de l'Irlande)

shamrock

nKlee m; (= leaf)Kleeblatt nt

shamrock

[ˈʃæmˌrɒk] ntrifoglio
References in classic literature ?
On the table was a roast sirloin of pork, garnished with shamrocks. He retorted with this, and drew the appropriate return of a bread pudding in an earthen dish.
On the one were the Stars and Stripes, on the other the Shamrock and Thistle.
They were strange ornaments to bring on a sea voyage--china pugs, tea-sets in miniature, cups stamped floridly with the arms of the city of Bristol, hair-pin boxes crusted with shamrock, antelopes' heads in coloured plaster, together with a multitude of tiny photographs, representing downright workmen in their Sunday best, and women holding white babies.
"Are you going to lift for The Shamrock?" asks Captain Hodgson.
BALLYHALE Shamrocks' latest All-Ireland success has seen them honoured with six places on the AIB GAA Club Player Awards team for hurling.
The tradition of handing out shamrocks has always been presided over by a woman since the regiment was first founded by the order of Queen Victoria in 1901.
THE Duchess of Cambridge got thethe St Patrick's day giggles yesterday after handing out yesterday after handing out shamrocks to the Irish Guards.
Kate presented shamrocks to 40 Officers and Warrant Officers at the parade.
TECHNICAL MISSION: Shamrocks dedicated application laboratory in its Newark, NJ, facility works to provide creative solutions to the most challenging customer needs.
KIRKBURTON'S second string maintained their quest for West Riding County Amateur League Reserve Division glory with a 5-2 win against Keighley Shamrocks.
My late father-in-law, Edward Marr, known as Ned or Eddie, played for the Shamrocks in the 1940s and early 1950s.
HORTICULT URALIS TS are racing against the clock to come up with a method for growing rainbow shamrocks in time for Belfast's St Patrick's Day celebrations.