magnification

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mag·ni·fi·ca·tion

 (măg′nə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. The act of magnifying or the state of being magnified.
2.
a. The process of enlarging the size of something, as an optical image.
b. Something that has been magnified; an enlarged representation, image, or model.
3. The ratio of the size of an image to the size of an object.

magnification

(ˌmæɡnɪfɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) the act of magnifying or the state of being magnified
2. (General Physics) the degree to which something is magnified
3. a copy, photograph, drawing, etc, of something magnified
4. (General Physics) a measure of the ability of a lens or other optical instrument to magnify, expressed as the ratio of the size of the image to that of the object

mag•ni•fi•ca•tion

(ˌmæg nə fɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of magnifying or the state of being magnified.
2. the power to magnify. Compare power (def. 19a).
3. a magnified image.
[1615–25; < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnification - the act of expanding something in apparent sizemagnification - the act of expanding something in apparent size
enlargement, expansion - the act of increasing (something) in size or volume or quantity or scope
2.magnification - the ratio of the size of an image to the size of the object
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
3.magnification - making to seem more important than it really is
deception, misrepresentation, deceit - a misleading falsehood
4.magnification - a photographic print that has been enlarged
photo, photograph, pic, exposure, picture - a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material

magnification

noun
1. enlargement, increase, inflation, boost, expansion, blow-up (informal), intensification, amplification, dilation, augmentation a magnification of the human eye
2. exaggeration, build-up, heightening, deepening, enhancement, aggrandizement the magnification of this character on the screen

magnification

noun
The honoring of a deity, as in worship:
Translations
تَكْبيرمَدى تَكبير الصّورَه
zvětšenízvětšenina
forstørrelse
stækkunstækkunargeta
büyü mebüyütmebüyütme gücü

magnification

[ˌmægnɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] N
1. (Opt) → aumento m, ampliación f
high magnificationgran aumento m
low magnificationpequeño aumento m
2. (fig) → exageración f

magnification

[ˌmægnɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] n
[microscope, binoculars] → grossissement m
(= enlargement) → amplification f

magnification

nVergrößerung f; high/low magnificationstarke/geringe Vergrößerung; seen at 300 magnificationsin 300facher Vergrößerung, 300fach vergrößert

magnification

[ˌmægnɪfɪˈkeɪʃn] ningrandimento

magnify

(ˈmӕgnifai) verb
to cause to appear greater. A telescope magnifies an image; to magnify one's troubles.
ˌmagnifiˈcation (-fi-) noun
1. the act of magnifying (something).
2. the power of magnifying. the magnification of a pair of binoculars.
3. the extent to which something (eg a photograph) has been magnified. The magnification is ten times (10 ).
ˈmagnifying-glass noun
a piece of glass with curved surfaces that makes an object looked at through it appear larger. This print is so small that I need a magnifying-glass to read it.

mag·ni·fi·ca·tion

n. magnificación, ampliación de un objeto.
References in periodicals archive ?
ST] taking into account both relative voltage change and number of voltage changes per minute, but also the shape factor which respects the duration of the voltage change for rectangular voltage changes even for periods shorter than 1 s.
According to Equation 2, the shape factor [gamma] is defined as the ratio between the length L of the sulfide and its thickness t.
To quantify leaf shape, we determined the ratio of leaf length to width (LL/LW) and shape factor (SF, leaf perimeter2/leaf area), where the latter represents the relative amount of leaf edge independent of size (Sack et al.
This process yields a slightly wider shape factor of approximately 5:1, compared to 4.
If they had been retained on the basis of attractiveness judgments emitted by a French sample, it is possible that other faces would have been selected, and the impact of the face shape factor would have been stronger among French participants, and weaker among Mozambican participants.
Two unknown time constants and shape factor which are given in Table II are identified by measuring the response of rectifier to a deep voltage sag with 0.
Table 1 provides a comparison in terms of bandwidth, insertion loss, shape factor and size between the proposed BPF and most similar BPFs that have been reported in [4-7] recently.
In this sense, the initial geometry of the studied workpieces have the following initial dimensions, diameter 10 mm and height of 5 mm and 10 mm, with these geometries of the workpiece are obtained a specific shape factor.