Shembe


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Shembe

(ˈʃɛmbɛ)
n
(Christian Churches, other) (in South Africa) an African sect that combines Christianity with aspects of Bantu religion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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This vibrant and colourful production is performed by over 20 artists and musicians from South Africa and combines theatre, film, song, storytelling and traditional Zulu and Shembe dance movements.
(12) Such prophets included William Wade Harris, a Km man from Liberia who worked in Ghana and Cote d'lvoire, Garrick Sokari Braide of the Niger Delta in Nigeria, Joseph Babalola also of Nigeria, Simon Kimbangu of the Congo, Isaiah Shembe of South Africa, and others.
Isaiah Shembe's Prophetic Uhlanga: The Worldview of the Nazareth Baptist Church in Colonial South Africa, by Joel E.
Isaiah Shembe's Hymns and the Sacred Dance in Ibandla LamaNazaretha
TISHKEN, Isaiah Shembe's Prophetic Uhlanga: the worldview of the Nazareth Baptist Church in colonial South Africa.
Those sections of the population which are closer to non-literacy in the English language in South Africa prefer the Zionist affiliations, Pentecostalism, the Shembe group (Prah 2015, p.6)
The hymns were composed in the isiZulu language by Isaiah and Galilee Shembe between 1910 and 1940, drawing on the Biblical Psalms as well as local and African American influences.
Every year, faithful from the Nazareth Baptist Church make a pilgrimage to Ebuhleni Mission, where their church's founder Isaiah Shembe lived in the southeastern part of the country.
Under the agreement, Shembe will be recognized as the inventor of the vuvuzela, an instrument his followers say he created a century ago using antelope horns.
For this instalment of the CityScapes series Pather engaged three culturally-specific forms: Shembe, (13) Celtic (14) and classical Indian dancing in the form of Kathak.
There is a fair amount of repetition and some truly surprising omissions (neither Isaiah Shembe nor Zionism appear in the index, for example).