exodus

(redirected from Shemot)
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ex·o·dus

 (ĕk′sə-dəs)
n.
1. A departure of a large number of people.
2. Exodus
a. In the Bible, the departure of the Israelites from Egypt.
b. See Table at Bible.

[Late Latin, from Greek exodos : ex-, out; see exo- + hodos, way, journey.]

exodus

(ˈɛksədəs)
n
the act or an instance of going out
[C17: via Latin from Greek exodos from ex-1 + hodos way]

Exodus

(ˈɛksədəs)
n
1. (Bible) the Exodus the departure of the Israelites from Egypt led by Moses
2. (Bible) the second book of the Old Testament, recounting the events connected with this and the divine visitation of Moses at Mount Sinai

ex•o•dus

(ˈɛk sə dəs)

n.
1. a mass departure or emigration: the summer exodus to the shore.
2. the Exodus, the departure of the Israelites from Egypt under Moses.
3. (cap.) the second book of the Bible, containing an account of the Exodus.
[before 1000; Middle English < Medieval Latin < Greek éxodos going out =ex- ex-3 + (h)odós way]

Exodus

The flight of the Children of Israel from Egypt into the wilderness and eventually to Canaan.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exodus - a journey by a large group to escape from a hostile environmentexodus - a journey by a large group to escape from a hostile environment
escape, flight - the act of escaping physically; "he made his escape from the mental hospital"; "the canary escaped from its cage"; "his flight was an indication of his guilt"
2.exodus - the second book of the Old Testament: tells of the departure of the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt led by MosesExodus - the second book of the Old Testament: tells of the departure of the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt led by Moses; God gave them the Ten Commandments and the rest of Mosaic law on Mount Sinai during the Exodus
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Laws, Pentateuch, Torah - the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unit

exodus

noun departure, withdrawal, retreat, leaving, flight, retirement, exit, migration, evacuation The exodus of refugees from the town shows no sign of abating.

exodus

noun
1. Departure from one's native land to settle in another:
2. The act of leaving:
Translations
خُروج، رحيل جَماعي
exodusudvandring
שמות
egzodus
kivonulás
brottför, brottflutningur
出エジプト記
masinis išėjimas
masveida iziešana/izbraukšana

exodus

[ˈeksədəs] N (gen, Rel) → éxodo m
there was a general exodushubo un éxodo general

exodus

[ˈɛksədəs] nexode m
the exodus to the cities → l'exode vers les villes

exodus

n
(from a country) → Abwanderung f; (Bibl: of Hebrews, also fig) → Exodus m; general exodusallgemeiner Aufbruch
exodus of capitalKapitalabwanderung f
(Bibl) Exodus2. Buch Mosis or Mose, Exodus m

exodus

[ˈɛksədəs] n (gen) (Rel) → esodo

exodus

(ˈeksədəs) noun
a going away of many people. There was a general exodus from the room.
References in periodicals archive ?
Israeli leaders called the massive and secret undertaking Shniyah Shemot, or "The Second Exodus," a reference to the departure of the Jews from slavery in ancient Egypt.
Part of a larger project aimed at mapping the technical medical terminology in medieval Hebrew medical works, this volume presents novel medical and general Hebrew terminology from the 13th century from primary and secondary sources: Sefer Sedat ha-Derakhim, Sefer ha-Shimmush, Sefer ha-Qanun, Sefer Issur ha-Qevurah le-Galienus, Hanhagat ha-Beri'ut le-Abu 'Ali Ben Zuhr, Shemot ha-Mashqim, Pirqei Arnaut de Vilanova, Sefer Hanhagat ha-Beri'ut, Sammim Libbiyim, and Sefer ha-Refu'ot ha-Libbiyot, as well as terms in the field of materia medica drawn from anonymous unpublished glossaries.
I wrote this poem when we started reading the book of Shemot this year, but its core feelings have been with me since my non-Jewish childhood in Germany: grief, and the longing to find and get to know what was lost.
Thus, the gates to God's kingdom "are at all times open" to the stranger, as it is written in the Midrash (Shemot Rabbah 19:4), that is, at all times open to the Righteous among the Nations who choose not to be followers of Judaism but who choose to love their neighbors, regardless of beliefs.
Among the books with a frame of interest to us are Toledot Noah (1634), a commentary on Shemot (Exodus) Rabbah by R.
In Shemot Rabbah we learn, "If all other troubles were placed on one side and poverty on the other, poverty would outweigh them all." Exodus Rabbah says, "There is nothing in the world more grievous than poverty; it is the most terrible of all sufferings." And Talmud Nedarim says, "Poverty is a kind of death."
The traditional Jewish name for the second book of Torah is ninw Shemot, "Names." However, it would be a considerable error to claim that early Jews thought this book contained only names--or, alternatively, to redefine the word "names" to mean something else only in this specific instance.5 Similarly, "Speech of the Jewish language" may well have been a general characterisation of the bulk of the text, rather than an all-inclusive description of its contents.
In Shemot (Exodus 20:8): "Remember the Sabbath Day to keep it holy" "Zakhor et Yom HaShabbat le'kadsho," the first word is "zakho" whereas in Devarim, (Deuteronomy 5:12), the first word is "shamor" (observe or guard) the Sabbath to keep it holy.
In an essay called "Parshat Shemot," Ponet meditates on why the Hebrew title of the book of Exodus should be Shemot, or "Names." The simple answer, of course, is that as with Genesis (Bereshit), this is one of the first words in the Hebrew text of the book.
Leibowitz, Studies in Shemot, Jerusalem: World Zionist Organization, 1976], 684-87.)
The Hebrew name for Exodus is shemot (names) because the book opens by recapitulating the names of the 12 sons.