shidduch


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Related to shidduch: Shadchan

shidduch

(ˈʃɪdəx)
n, pl shidduchim (ʃɪˈduːxɪm)
1. (Judaism)
a. an arranged marriage
b. the arrangement of a marriage
2. (Judaism) any negotiated agreement
[from Hebrew: see shadchan]
References in periodicals archive ?
But within minutes, they realize there has been a misunderstanding: David was supposed to meet a different Sarah, and they're on the wrong shidduch dates.
Continue reading "College Football Shidduch Alert: Jedd Fisch Hired By UCLA, Where He'll Coach QB Josh Rosen" at.
Moshe Sher is on the verge of bankruptcy, a situation that forces his daughter to abruptly end a promising shidduch (matchmaking for potential marriage).
When his youngest sister was married off (at eighteen), his parents gave up trying to arrange a shidduch.
It was a great shidduch (Yiddish and Hebrew for aea match,')" he observed, with the result "Broadway Musicals: A Jewish Legacy," which begins airing Jan.
In truth, like so many crazes and fads in Israel, the era of the Ukrainian shidduch was short-lived: a number of Israelis gave it a try, bringing back their brides, but the marriages were but of limited duration, due to differences in mentality, difficulty in adjusting to a new country, and age differential (some Israelis of mature age wanted to bring back a young bride to make their friends jealous).
It's created a shidduch (Yiddish for steps leading to a marriage proposal) over terrorism.
After the Shidduch, which connects the old world with the new via the plain American girl's last greenhorn chance (which nicely illustrates how little divided interwar Polish and American Jewry were) we are given Elijah and the Prophets of Baal, which matches apocalyptic Communists against sobered Talmudists.
The men were dismissed as deranged, especially when one explained that he had to break the tiles because their glaze was preventing him from getting a shidduch (an arranged marriage).
At the beginning of the year, we posted our inaugural entry in the Scroll Shidduch Series.
Grossman's credentials are impeccable, his yichus (ancestry) in the Lithuanian Jewish intellectual world is unmatchable, and the Torah academy has flourished with the greatest success, not just growing exponentially from one hundred and twenty-five to six hundred students, but with an extensive shidduch system of marrying off its students to girls of wealthy families so that the young men can live a life assumed to be the most noble, devoting themselves exclusively to Torah and having a family without economic coustraints.
Strangely, the place that pays particular attention to separating the men from the women becomes a vibrant singles arena, where love can be ignited from afar in a festive and non-binding atmosphere, after which worshippers can return home with a new kippah-donned shidduch.