Song of Solomon

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Song of Solomon

n.
See Table at Bible.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Song of Solomon

n
(Bible) the Song of Solomon a book of the Old Testament consisting of a collection of dramatic love poems traditionally ascribed to Solomon. Also known as: the Song of Songs or the Canticle of Canticles
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Song of Solomon - an Old Testament book consisting of a collection of love poems traditionally attributed to Solomon but actually written much later
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Hagiographa, Ketubim, Writings - the third of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures
sapiential book, wisdom book, wisdom literature - any of the biblical books (Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus) that are considered to contain wisdom
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
While studying in the doctoral program at the University of Southern California, I stumbled upon a school in the center of Hollywood called Montessori Shir Hashirim (frequently known as the Montessori School of Hollywood) that wanted to hire a music instructor.
It is the righteous, according to the Midrash, whom God tries with suffering, just as a potter tests the apparently wholesome pieces of pottery but not the cracked ones (Shir HaShirim Rabbah on 2:16).
Yet, because all the many names of God call upon the same one God, it is also not surprising that many of the ninety-nine beautiful names of God in Muslim tradition also appear in Jewish tradition, which sometimes refers to the seventy names of God (Midrash Shir HaShirim and Midrash Otiot Rabbi Akiba).