Sholem Aleichem


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Sholem Aleichem

n
(Biography) See Aleichem
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He was friend, confidante, and majordomo to some of the giants of modern Yiddish literature, including Sholem Aleichem, S.
It is based on the book Tevye and his Daughters and other tales by Sholem Aleichem.
"Dear Children!" The Yiddish writer Sholem Aleichem wrote to his family from Saint Petersburg in 1904, "I'm writing to all of you under the fresh impression of my first visit with an idol of our day, the master of ideas--Maxim Gorky." (1)
Ted Merwin's Pastrami on Rye: An Overstuffed History of the Jewish Deli illustrates this moment in history with a quote from a Sholem Aleichem novel, written in Yiddish in 1916: "Maybe you've heard of Hibru Neshnel Delikatesn.
Krah also looks at other depictions of Eastern Europe, such as Maurice Samuel's The World of Sholem Aleichem (1943), Irving Howe and Eliezer Greenberg's anthology Treasury of Yiddish Stories (1954), and Isaac Bashevis Singer's "subversive spirituality" (230).
By the late 19th century, Odessa had become the center of modern Jewish literature and culture in Russia, drawing writers such as Sholem Aleichem to the Cafe Fanconi, where customers read newspapers from all over the world and speculated on currencies and stocks.
A chapter by Eddy Portnoy on a Yiddish puppet theater provides insight into a little-remembered Jewish art form; Alisa Solomon examines the background to Fiddler on the Hoof and the stories by Sholem Aleichem on which the show is based; and Arnold Aronson writes on the influence of Yiddish theater on American design.
Encompassing not only the expected topics (Sholem Aleichem's stories, Jerome Robbins's feud with Zero Mostel, the casting for the film) but also subjects that have never before been considered vis-a-vis their relationship to Fiddler (Hebrew theater in the forties, black-Jewish relations in the sixties, Fiddlers impact on contemporary Jewish rituals), this is cultural history at its finest.
The author explores 18 classics of Jewish literature to illustrate Jewish thought and experience over a period of 2,500 years: the books of Deuteronomy and Esther, The Exposition of Laws by Philo of Alexandria, The Jewish War by Flavius Josephus, Pirkei Avot, the Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela, the Kuzari by Yehuda Halevi, The Guide of the Perplexed by Moses Maimonides, the Zohar, the Tsenerene and the Memoirs of GlEckel of Hameln, Theological-Political Treatise by Baruch Spinoza, the Autobiography of Solomon Maimon, Jerusalem by Moses Mendelssohn, the Tales of Nachman of Bratslav, The Jewish State and Old New Land by Theodor Herzl, and Tevye the Dairyman by Sholem Aleichem. He describes what they contain, how and why they were written, and what they reveal about Judaism and Jewishness.
It's been more than half a century since director/choreographer Jerome Robbins nurtured a mega-hit musical from the Yiddish tales of Sholem Aleichem, and many things have changed.
Many centuries before Sholem Aleichem's writings served as inspiration for the honest words of Tevye's tongue, a man named Agur prayed an equally honest but somewhat different prayer to God regarding His economics.