short cut

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short cut

n
1. a route that is shorter than the usual one
2. a means of saving time or effort
vb, -cuts, -cutting or -cut
(intr) to use a short cut
[C16: from cut (in the sense: a direct route)]
Translations
References in classic literature ?
For several days they kept along the course of Snake River, occasionally making short cuts across hills and promontories, where there were bends in the stream.
At length, by unfrequented roads, short cuts, and secret paths, Roque, Don Quixote, and Sancho, together with six squires, set out for Barcelona.
He will be forced to halt for fuel and for food, and the launch must follow the windings of the river; we can take short cuts while they are traversing the detour.
When the peasants have a couple of leagues to walk to their work, and have to tramp back wearily in the evening, they perhaps see sportsmen taking short cuts over ploughed land and pasture so as to be back to dinner a little sooner, and is it to be supposed that they will hesitate to follow the example?
For the Kensington Gardens, you must know, are full of short cuts, familiar to all who play there; and the shortest leads from the baby in long clothes to the little boy of three riding on the fence.
In the meantime that rascal, Pinocchio, free now from the clutches of the Carabineer, was running wildly across fields and meadows, taking one short cut after another toward home.
There is, indeed, no such short cut to knowledge of each other as a talk about books.
By the road, Baywater was six miles away, but there was a short cut across hills and fields and woods which was scantly three.
When the dew was not too heavy and the weather was fair there was a short cut through the woods.
After supper, when grandfather set off to church, grandmother and I took my short cut through the willow hedge and went over to hear about the visit to the Shimerdas'.
When I had done a year of high school, I decided to attempt a short cut.
A child on the watch, came towards them to beg; and Miss Bickerton, excessively frightened, gave a great scream, and calling on Harriet to follow her, ran up a steep bank, cleared a slight hedge at the top, and made the best of her way by a short cut back to Highbury.