shorter


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short

 (shôrt)
adj. short·er, short·est
1. Having little length; not long.
2. Having little height; not tall.
3. Extending or traveling not far or not far enough: a short toss.
4.
a. Lasting a brief time: a short holiday.
b. Appearing to pass quickly: finished the job in a few short months.
5. Not lengthy; succinct: short and to the point.
6.
a. Rudely brief; abrupt: The owner was quite short with the new hire.
b. Easily provoked; irascible: has a short temper.
7. Inadequate; insufficient: oil in short supply; were short on experience.
8. Lacking in length or amount: a board that is short two inches.
9. Lacking in breadth or scope: a short view of the problem.
10. Deficient in retentiveness: a short memory.
11.
a. Holding a trading position that is inversely related to the price of a security or index: short investors; an investor who is short gold.
b. Of or relating to a short sale: a short position.
12.
a. Containing a large amount of shortening; flaky: a short pie crust.
b. Not ductile; brittle: short iron.
13.
a. Linguistics Of, relating to, or being a speech sound of relatively brief duration, as the first vowel sound in the Latin word mălus, "evil," as compared with the same or a similar sound of relatively long duration, as the first vowel sound in the Latin word mālus, "apple tree."
b. Grammar Of, relating to, or being a vowel sound in English, such as the vowel sound (ă) in pat or (o͝o) in put, that is descended from a vowel of brief duration.
14. Being of relatively brief duration. Used of a syllable in quantitative prosody.
15. Slang Close to the end of a tour of military duty.
adv. shorter, shortest
1. Abruptly; quickly: stop short.
2. In a rude or curt manner.
3. At a point before a given boundary, limit, or goal: a missile that landed short of the target.
4. At a disadvantage: We were caught short by the sudden storm.
5. By means of a short sale: selling a commodity short.
n.
1. Something short, as:
a. Linguistics A short syllable, vowel, or consonant.
b. A brief film; a short subject.
c. A size of clothing less long than the average for that size.
d. shorts Short pants extending to the knee or above.
e. shorts Undershorts.
2.
a. A short sale.
b. One that sells short.
3. shorts A byproduct of wheat processing that consists of germ, bran, and coarse meal or flour.
4. shorts Clippings or trimmings that remain as byproducts in various manufacturing processes, often used to make an inferior variety of the product.
5.
a. A short circuit.
b. A malfunction caused by a short circuit.
6. Baseball A shortstop.
v. short·ed, short·ing, shorts
v.tr.
1. To cause a short circuit in.
2. Informal To give (one) less than one is entitled to; shortchange.
3. To short-sell (a security or index).
v.intr.
To short-circuit.
Idioms:
for short
As an abbreviation: He's called Ed for short.
in short
In summary; briefly.
short for
An abbreviation of: Ed is short for Edward.
short of
1. Having an inadequate supply of: We're short of cash.
2. Less than: Nothing short of her best effort was required to make the team.
3. Other than; without resorting to: Short of yelling at him, I had no other way to catch his attention.
4. Not quite willing to undertake or do; just this side of: She stopped short of throwing out the old photo.
the short end of the stick
The worst side of an unequal deal.

[Middle English, from Old English sceort, scort; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

short′ness n.

Shor·ter

 (shôr′tər), Wayne Born 1933.
American jazz saxophonist who was a leading figure in the hard bop and jazz rock movements.

shorter

  • store - A shortened version of the obsolete astor, "stock of provisions, supplies."
  • alligator - From Spanish el lagarto, "the lizard," which may have come from Latin lacerta; the alligator has a shorter, blunter snout than a crocodile.
  • telescopic umbrella - An umbrella that can become shorter.
  • dog watch - A two-hour watch on board a ship, it is based on dog sleep, the light or fitful sleep typical of dogs (a catnap being even shorter).
References in classic literature ?
It has seemed shorter than usual, but so uncomfortable," said Meg.
He was al- most a foot shorter than Hal, and when the younger man came and put his two hands on the older man's shoulders they made a picture.
The hunting-shirt is a picturesque smock-frock, being shorter, and ornamented with fringes and tassels.
The fascination of a gracious day and the leafy solitude of the canyon led them to prolong their ride beyond the proposed limit, and it became necessary towards sunset for them to seek some shorter cut home.
We were too far apart to call to each other, but there was a moment at which, at shorter range, some challenge between us, breaking the hush, would have been the right result of our straight mutual stare.
The big packers did not turn their hands off and close down, like the canning factories; but they began to run for shorter and shorter hours.
Con- ducted by mailed guards bearing flaring torches, we tramped along echoing corridors, and down stone stair- ways dank and dripping, and smelling of mould and ages of imprisoned night -- a chill, uncanny journey and a long one, and not made the shorter or the cheerier by the sorceress's talk, which was about this sufferer and his crime.
It is only two or three thousand feet high, and of course has no snow upon it in summer, whereas the Jungfrau is not much shorter of fourteen thousand feet high and therefore that lowest verge of snow on her side, which seems nearly down to the valley level, is really about seven thousand feet higher up in the air than the summit of that wooded rampart.
Tom bent all his energies to the memorizing of five verses, and he chose part of the Sermon on the Mount, because he could find no verses that were shorter.
After every successful trade he generally passed a longer or shorter term in jail; for when a poor man without goods or chattels has the inveterate habit of swapping, it follows naturally that he must have something to swap; and having nothing of his own, it follows still more naturally that he must swap something belonging to his neighbors.
It could not have lasted more than two hours: many a week has seemed shorter.
The young English governess who came to teach her to read and write disliked her so much that she gave up her place in three months, and when other governesses came to try to fill it they always went away in a shorter time than the first one.