Shulchan Aruch

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Shulchan Aruch

(ʃʊlˈxɑn ɑrˈʊx; ˈʃʊlxən ˈɑʊrəx)
n
(Judaism) the main codification of Jewish law derived from the Talmud, compiled by the 16th-century rabbi, Joseph Caro
References in periodicals archive ?
Mathew Passion of Biedermeier Berlin." The Shulchan Arukh, Talmudim, and other rabbinic literature warn against the learning of non-Jewish theologies relegated by some observant Orthodox Jews to "forbidden worship" (known as avodat kochavim and avodah zarah).
The Shulchan Arukh says, "A person should not contribute to a charity fund unless he knows its management is reliable and knows how to conduct the fund correctly" (Yorah Deah 249.7).
(15.) Magen Avraham 250:2 , Panim Yafot to Leviticus 17:13, Shulchan Arukh HaRav Orech Chayyim 250:4.
Notwithstanding the Shulchan Arukh dictum that 10 men must be physically in one location, there is a clause in the Jewish tradition for a person unable to reach the synagogue to pray at home at the same time as the minyan is in prayer.
The Shulchan Arukh (Even ha-Ezer 1:1), which is a compilation of the Jewish laws, references this as the source for men's obligation to procreate (Biale, 1994).
(22.) Sefer Mitzvot Gadol (Rabbi Moshe MiKotzi 1250, 1st printing 1488), 81, Sefer Mitzvot Katan [based on Sefer Mitzvot Gadol] (Rabbi Itzhak MiKorville d.1280) 72, Tur (Rabbi Jacob Ben Asher 1270-1343) YD 180, and Shulchan Arukh (Rabbi Joseph Karo 1488-1575) YD 180.
But this, too, was no= t enough for Jews suffering in the Exile, and Rabbi Moshe Isserles =96 16th= -century co-author of the classic Jewish-legal code Shulchan Arukh =96 adde= d yet another stanza, praying for deliverance from a future adversary, the = descendants of Ishmael.
Members of the State Duma and other prominent figures expressed anti-Semitic sentiments in a January 2005 letter, urging the prosecutor general to investigate Jewish organizations and initiate proceedings to ban them, charging that a Russian translation of ancient Jewish law, the Kitzur Shulchan Arukh, incited hatred against non-Jews.
Finally, in the fifteenth century, Joseph Caro wrote the Shulchan Arukh. He evaluated three major works of legal rulings written in earlier centuries, including the Mishneh Torah, and chose what he considered the most definitive rulings.
Because of the dramatic history of Hebrew, a speaker and reader of the modern language may, with some effort, access the diachronic richness of Hebrew literature from the most archaic Song of the Sea (Exodus 15, 13th century BCE), to the songs composed by a current Israeli rock group, including along the way, for example, the prophecies of Isaiah (8th century BCE), the language of the Mishnah (3rd century CE), the Hebrew of the Babylonian Talmud (5th-6th centuries) a poem of Yehuda Halevi (11th-12th centuries), the great Hebrew treatises of Moses Maimonides (12th century) the Shulchan Arukh (16th century), Mesillat Yesharim (The Pathway of the Upright) by Moses Hayyim Luzzatto (18th century), and the poetry of Hayyim Nachman Bialik (d.
Between the 1520s and the 1550s, the Iberian-born Joseph Caro produced a prodigious codification of Jewish law (halakhah) and its sources called Bet Yosef, "The House of Joseph," best known through its digest form, the Shulchan arukh ("A Set Table").