Siberian traps


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Related to Siberian traps: Deccan Traps, ichthyosaurs

Siberian traps

A very large region of thick basaltic rock near the Siberian city of Tura and associated with one of the largest volcanic eruptions in the earth's history. The eruption took place approximately 245 million years ago and is thought to be a cause of the mass extinctions at the boundary of the Permian and Triassic Periods.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, Algeo said, the Siberian Traps eruptions spewed so much material in the air, particularly greenhouse gases, that it warmed the planet by an average of about 10 degrees centigrade.
Burgess, who has researched the Siberian Traps volcanic events but did not work on the new Science paper, said scientists believe magma rising from the earth released some extinction-causing greenhouse gases.
In fact, only two eruptions were larger than the one in the Pacific Northwest: the basalt flood of the Siberian Traps and the Deccan Traps.
A devastating confluence of geological events is thought to have triggered the Great Dying a quarter-billion years ago, including a massive eruption of climate-changing carbon dioxide from volcanoes associated with the Siberian Traps. Numerous studies have pointed to ocean anoxia playing a role in both the actual extinction event and its prolonged recovery phase.
The Siberian Traps eruptions spewed more than 3 million cubic kilometers of molten rock (SN: 1/15/11, p.
They found volcanism related to the formation of the Siberian Traps likely injected two pulses of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere during the Permian-Triassic Boundary extinction, which lasted about 60,000 years.
Some researchers have suggested that these gases might have been spewed out by the volcanic eruptions that produced the Siberian traps, a vast formation of volcanic rock produced by the most extensive eruptions in Earth's geological record.
The Siberian Traps eruptions created millions of square miles of new igneous rock, and released massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at the same time.
The explosion created the Siberian Traps, huge deposits of igneous rocks in what is now Russia.
It is believed to have been caused by volcanic eruptions in Russia which produced a huge area of lava known as the Siberian traps.
An even larger lava field, the Siberian Traps, covers the Noril'sk-Putarana Plateau in north central Siberia.
"It makes we wonder whether we may see some external forcing mechanism, like the impact for the Deccan Traps, for other flood basalts that lead up to major peaks in eruptions, like the Columbia River basalts or the Siberian Traps," Renne said.