Brulé

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Bru·lé

 (bro͞o-lā′)
n. pl. Brulé or Bru·lés
A member of a Native American people constituting a subdivision of the Lakota, with a present-day population in southwest South Dakota.

[French brûlé, burnt (partial translation of their own name for themselves).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Brule

(bruːˈleɪ) or

Brûlé

n
(Peoples) (sometimes not capital) short for bois-brûlé
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brule - a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Lakota, Teton, Teton Dakota, Teton Sioux - a member of the large western branch of Sioux people which was made up of several groups that lived on the plains
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Vi Wain, a member of the Sicangu Lakota Nation and a nationally
Caption: Samantha Jones of the Sicangu Lakota band of the Rosebud Sioux, left, and Casey Camp of the Ponca Nation, are seen in Washington in a 2014 file photo.
While the timing of this convergence is unique, FastHorse (Sicangu Lakota), Nagle (Cherokee), and Studi (Cherokee) are in no way new to the American theatre.
Connecting modern psychology to its Indigenous roots to enhance the healing process and psychology itself, "Indigenous Healing Psychology: Honoring the Wisdom of the First Peoples" by Richard Katz (Professor Emeritus at the First Nations University of Canada and an adjunct professor of psychology at the University of Saskatchewa) shares the healing wisdom of the Indigenous people Professor Katz has worked with, including the Ju/'hoansi of the Kalahari Desert, the Fijians of the South Pacific, Sicangu Lakota people, and Cree and Anishnabe First Nations people.
Dorothy FireCloud, Sicangu Lakota, is currently the superintendent of Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments.
He was Sicangu (Rosebud) Lakota, and was born on the outskirts of Saint Francis, South Dakota to parents Joseph and Emily Hollow Horn Bear White Hat.
Craig Howe, Director of the Center for American Indian Research and Native Studies; and Sicangu (Rosebud) Lakota writer, Tribal and Spiritual leader Albert White Hat, Sr.
Show performers were Oglala and Sicangu (Brule) from the Pine Ridge and Rosebud reservations and Cheyenne, Ponca, Sac and Fox, Comanche, and Kiowa from the former Indian Territory.
There was the story of this Sicangu Lakota guy from Rosebud, Virgil Longest Braids, who walked into the Prairie Wind Casino around 9:58 pm.
I arrived at my profession with personal experience since I grew up on the Rosebud Reservation, home to roughly 24,000 Sicangu Lakota tribal members, almost 21,000 of whom live on the 1,400- plus square-mile land.
While they were here, Kline took them to visit the Rosebud Indian Reservation, home of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate ("Burnt Thigh People").