Sicily

(redirected from Sicilians)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Si·ci·ly

 (sĭs′ə-lē)
An island of southern Italy in the Mediterranean Sea west of the southern end of the Italian peninsula. It was colonized from the eighth century bc by Greeks, who displaced the earlier Phoenician settlers. The next conquerors were Carthaginians, who in turn were conquered by Romans in the third century bc. After a succession of other rulers the island came under the control of the Normans in the 11th century ad and formed the nucleus of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, consisting of Sicily and southern Italy. The island continued to change hands until a later kingdom was conquered by Giuseppe Garibaldi in 1860 and became part of unified Italy.

Sicily

(ˈsɪsɪlɪ)
n
(Placename) the largest island in the Mediterranean, separated from the tip of SW Italy by the Strait of Messina: administratively an autonomous region of Italy; settled by Phoenicians, Greeks, and Carthaginians before the Roman conquest of 241 bc; under Normans (12th–13th centuries); formed the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies with Naples in 1815; mountainous and volcanic. Capital: Palermo. Pop: 4 972 124 (2003 est). Area: 25 460 sq km (9830 sq miles). Latin names: Sicilia or Trinacria Italian name: Sicilia

Sic•i•ly

(ˈsɪs ə li)

n.
the largest island in the Mediterranean, constituting a region of Italy, and separated from the SW tip of the mainland by the Strait of Messina. 5,141,343; 9924 sq. mi. (25,705 sq. km). Cap.: Palermo. Italian, Sicilia. Ancient, Sicilia, Trinacria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sicily - the Italian region on the island of SicilySicily - the Italian region on the island of Sicily
Aegadean Islands, Aegadean Isles, Aegates, Egadi Islands, Isole Egadi - a group of islands off the west coast of Sicily in the Mediterranean
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
Messina - a port city in northeastern Sicily on the Strait of Messina
Siracusa, Syracuse - a city in southeastern Sicily that was founded by Corinthians in the 8th century BC
Palermo - the capital of Sicily; located in northwestern Sicily; an important port for 3000 years
Acragas, Agrigento - a town in Italy in southwestern Sicily near the coast; the site of six Greek temples
Etna, Mount Etna, Mt Etna - an inactive volcano in Sicily; last erupted in 1961; the highest volcano in Europe (10,500 feet)
Sicilian - a resident of Sicily
2.Sicily - the largest island in the Mediterranean
Passero, Cape Passero - a naval battle in the Mediterranean Sea off Cape Passero in which the Spanish navy was destroyed by France and England while attempting to recover Sicily and Sardinia from Italy (1719)
siege of Syracuse, Syracuse - the Athenian siege of Syracuse (415-413 BC) was eventually won by Syracuse
siege of Syracuse, Syracuse - the Roman siege of Syracuse (214-212 BC) was eventually won by the Romans who sacked the city (killing Archimedes)
Cape Passero, Passero Cape - a cape that forms the southeastern corner of the island of Sicily
Mediterranean, Mediterranean Sea - the largest inland sea; between Europe and Africa and Asia
Translations

Sicily

[ˈsɪsɪlɪ] NSicilia f

Sicily

[ˈsɪsɪli] nSicile f
in Sicily → en Sicile
to Sicily → en Sicile

Sicily

nSizilien nt

Sicily

[ˈsɪsɪlɪ] nla Sicilia
References in classic literature ?
But when he came to the field of combat he found he was born too late and too early--too late to stop the strife, under the shadow of the grim Sicilians leaning on their oars, and too early to anticipate any disastrous issue of it.
Yet this Catalan has eyes that glisten like those of the vengeful Spaniards, Sicilians, and Calabrians, and the other has fists big enough to crush an ox at one blow.
It reminded him of the Sicilians he had seen in London in their little sordid tragedies.
As very few of the better class of workingmen could be got for such work, these specimens of the new American hero contained an assortment of the criminals and thugs of the city, besides Negroes and the lowest foreigners-Greeks, Roumanians, Sicilians, and Slovaks.
Agathocles, the Sicilian,[*] became King of Syracuse not only from a private but from a low and abject position.
suddenly cried the Sicilian seaman, who being posted at the mizen-mast-head, stood directly behind Ahab, though somewhat lower than his level, and with a deep gulf of air dividing them.
For it is most true, that a natural and secret hatred, and aversation towards society, in any man, hath somewhat of the savage beast; but it is most untrue, that it should have any character at all, of the divine nature; except it proceed, not out of a pleasure in solitude, but out of a love and desire to sequester a man's self, for a higher conversation: such as is found to have been falsely and feignedly in some of the heathen; as Epimenides the Candian, Numa the Roman, Empedocles the Sicilian, and Apollonius of Tyana; and truly and really, in divers of the ancient hermits and holy fathers of the church.
Apart - like fire-flies in Sicilian night, And wing to other worlds another light
Gringoire had succeeded in learning that, while a mere child, she had traversed Spain and Catalonia, even to Sicily; he believed that she had even been taken by the caravan of Zingari, of which she formed a part, to the kingdom of Algiers, a country situated in Achaia, which country adjoins, on one side Albania and Greece; on the other, the Sicilian Sea, which is the road to Constantinople.
It is about 8 miles thence to the Sicilian coast, so Ulysses may be perfectly well told that after passing Scylla he will come to the Thrinacian island or Sicily.
And in many of the southern and Sicilian provinces the jingle of the telephone bell is still an unfamiliar sound.
Take care that the French do not take their revenge on you for the Sicilian vespers.