Sidney


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Related to Sidney: Sidney Poitier, Sidney Lumet

Sid·ney

 (sĭd′nē), Sir Philip 1554-1586.
English poet, politician, and soldier. His works include the sonnet sequence Astrophel and Stella and the collection of pastoral idylls Arcadia, both published posthumously.

Sidney

(ˈsɪdnɪ) or

Sydney

n
1. (Biography) Algernon. 1622–83, English Whig politician, beheaded for his supposed part in the Rye House Plot to assassinate Charles II and the future James II: author of Discourses Concerning Government (1689)
2. (Biography) Sir Philip. 1554–86, English poet, courtier, and soldier. His works include the pastoral romance Arcadia (1590), the sonnet sequence Astrophel and Stella (1591), and The Defence of Poesie (1595), one of the earliest works of literary criticism in English

Sid•ney

or Syd•ney

(ˈsɪd ni)

n.
Sir Philip, 1554–86, English poet, statesman, and soldier.
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Noun1.Sidney - English poet (1554-1586)Sidney - English poet (1554-1586)    
References in classic literature ?
3] The Cerographic Atlas of the United States (1842-1845), by Sidney Edwards Morse (1794-1871), son of the geographer, Jedidiah Morse, and brother of the painter-inventor, Samuel F.
Most likely you are to blame; for Sidney is far more reasonable than you.
Sidney is mad, I think; and his honeymoon has brought his madness out.
The struggle was for chartered rights--for English liberties--for the cause of Algernon Sidney and John Hampden--for trial by jury- -the Habeas Corpus and Magna Charta.
At first, for some reason or other, he evaded the inquiry, but afterwards told me that, when a boy, he had been carried to sea by the captain of a trading vessel, with whom he had stayed three years, living part of the time with him at Sidney in Australia, and that at a subsequent visit to the island, the captain had, at his own request, permitted him to remain among his countrymen.
Sir Philip Sidney, the Earl of Essex, Sir Walter Raleigh, are men of great figure and of few deeds.
I'm the son of the Reverend Sidney Hirst, vicar of Great Wappyng in Norfolk.
I tried other essayists, other critics, whom the machinist had in his library, but it was useless; neither Sidney Smith nor Thomas Carlyle could console me; I sighed for more Macaulay and evermore Macaulay.
I shall require the A3X cipher, Sidney," he said to his secretary.
Spenser went, and through his friend he came to know Sir Philip Sidney, a true gentleman and a poet like himself, who in turn made him known to the great Earl of Leicester, Elizabeth's favorite.
So stand before every public and private work; before an oration of Burke, before a victory of Napoleon, before a martyrdom of Sir Thomas More, of Sidney, of Marmaduke Robinson; before a French Reign of Terror, and a Salem hanging of witches; before a fanatic Revival and the Animal Magnetism in Paris, or in Providence.
Sidney Porkenham, were ready to burst with jealousy and despair.