Sidonian


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Sidonian

(saɪˈdəʊnɪən)
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to the ancient Phoenician city of Sidon or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of or relating to the ancient Phoenician city of Sidon or its inhabitants
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Sidon
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Came Ashtoreth, whom the Phoenicians called Astarte, Queen of Heaven, with crescent horns; To whose bright image nightly by the moon Sidonian virgins paid their vows and songs."
With these in troop Came ASTORETH, whom the PHOENICIANS call'd ASTARTE, Queen of Heav'n, with crescent Horns; To whose bright Image nightly by the Moon SIDONIAN Virgins paid their Vows and Songs, In SION also not unsung, where stood Her Temple on th' offensive Mountain, built By that uxorious King, whose heart though large, Beguil'd by fair Idolatresses, fell To Idols foul.
She then went down into her fragrant store-room, where her embroidered robes were kept, the work of Sidonian women, whom Alexandrus had brought over from Sidon when he sailed the seas upon that voyage during which he carried off Helen.
I went to Cyprus, Phoenicia and the Egyptians; I went also to the Ethiopians, the Sidonians, and the Erembians, and to Libya where the lambs have horns as soon as they are born, and the sheep lamb down three times a year.
Phaedimus, king of the Sidonians, gave it me in the course of a visit which I paid him when I returned thither on my homeward journey.
In the Iliad, Hecuba brings Athena robes woven by the Sidonian women whom Paris had brought back to Troy when returning with Helen (6.288-95).
Marianne Stern writes that evidence of Sidon's fame exists today in the form of "surviving signatures of glass blowers who added the toponymic 'Sidonian' in Greek and Latin to their names."
A particular tour de force is a powerful and double life-size Sidonian female head from a sarcophagus, dated to the 5th century BC (Fig.
The text from Kings tells the plight of a Sidonian woman.
Other glass-makers working in Rome in the 1st century AD signed their names in Greek and Latin and boasted of their Sidonian origin.
Obviously, the young Sidonian presents a different opinion.
These Miltonic re-writes of Aeneas's Sidonian Dido as Adam's Edenic Eve anticipate Fielding's treatment of his heroine Amelia, in a novel where the mythical method as an independent historical phenomenon apparently comes into its own rather decisively.