Sidon

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Si·don

 (sīd′n)
An ancient city of Phoenicia on the Mediterranean Sea in present-day southwest Lebanon. Founded in the third millennium bc, it was an important trade center known for its glassware and purple dyes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Sidon

(ˈsaɪdən)
n
(Placename) the chief city of ancient Phoenicia: founded in the third millennium bc; wealthy through trade and the making of glass and purple dyes; now the Lebanese city of Saïda
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Si•don

(ˈsaɪd n)

n.
a city of ancient Phoenicia: site of modern Saida.
Si•do′ni•an (-ˈdoʊ ni ən) adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sidon - the main city of ancient PhoeniciaSidon - the main city of ancient Phoenicia  
Lebanese Republic, Lebanon - an Asian republic at east end of Mediterranean
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Sidon

[ˈsaɪdən] NSidón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
I went to Cyprus, Phoenicia and the Egyptians; I went also to the Ethiopians, the Sidonians, and the Erembians, and to Libya where the lambs have horns as soon as they are born, and the sheep lamb down three times a year.
Phaedimus, king of the Sidonians, gave it me in the course of a visit which I paid him when I returned thither on my homeward journey.
Came Ashtoreth, whom the Phoenicians called Astarte, Queen of Heaven, with crescent horns; To whose bright image nightly by the moon Sidonian virgins paid their vows and songs."
With these in troop Came ASTORETH, whom the PHOENICIANS call'd ASTARTE, Queen of Heav'n, with crescent Horns; To whose bright Image nightly by the Moon SIDONIAN Virgins paid their Vows and Songs, In SION also not unsung, where stood Her Temple on th' offensive Mountain, built By that uxorious King, whose heart though large, Beguil'd by fair Idolatresses, fell To Idols foul.
She then went down into her fragrant store-room, where her embroidered robes were kept, the work of Sidonian women, whom Alexandrus had brought over from Sidon when he sailed the seas upon that voyage during which he carried off Helen.
"We will collect donations from Sidonians to purchase the sheep, and scouts will stand in the souks to let people know about our Adha project," he said.
Finally, Martin's third case in this chapter returns us to Phoenicia proper, where the Sidonians brought three stone anthropoid sarcophagi looted(?) from Saite Egypt under Cambyses, two of them (re)inscribed for royal burials.
To worsen matters, our professional umpire, the NUJ, is either busy waffling over allegation of Buharism in its President's school credentials or is taking a nap from professional policing like Baal the god of idolatrous Sidonians, a seaport on the Mediterranean Sea in modern Lebanon.
Solomon, according to the First Book of Kings, fornicated with 'many foreign women, as well as the daughter of Pharaoh: women of the Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, Sidonians and Hittites,' but no mention is made of the Ethiopian queen.
Scripture states: "For Solomon went after Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, and after Milcom the abomination of the Ammonites" (I Kings 11: 5).
Of the many deities to which his foreign wives turned Solomon's heart, perhaps the best known in the ancient world was Ashtoreth, the goddess of the Sidonians (11:5, 33).
The room opened out on the garden and a delicate odour of flowers mingled with the scent of the five perfumed young Sidonians. There were readings from Meleager, Krinagoras, Rhianos.